x
Chess - Play & Learn

Chess.com

FREE - In Google Play

FREE - in Win Phone Store

VIEW

Let the games begin

Annabelle
Aug 1, 2012, 2:22 PM 0

This article has been copied from the link at the bottom. It was last night on chessdom and suddenly 'removed' or 'deleted' - that's why I copied it this time. According to Wikipedia: Chess has been acknowledged as a sport by the IOC since 1999. So, why not an Olympic sport? Why, like a youngster said to her teacher-mum, '...is archery a sport, you don't get any exercise?' Well, good question. Same as chess - like some people think. So, if I shoot from a distance, no really physical exercise, why can't chess not be included for the same reason...apart from the many other reasons? -good thinking, little one!

2012 Olympics: Chess should be included – for players and parents

Chess isn't included in the list of events for the 2012 Olympics, though as an officially-recognized sport, it should be. Like other sports, chess attracts driven players and supportive parents to world competitions.

Of all the unusual sports that should be included in the 2012 Olympics, chess actually has a legitimate claim: This year marks the 85th anniversary of chess being an officially recognized body of sport by the International Olympic Committee.

Lisa Suhay

Lisa Suhay, who has four sons at home in Norfolk, Va., is a children’s book author and founder of the Norfolk (Va.) Initiative for Chess Excellence (NICE) , a nonprofit organization serving at-risk youth via mentoring and teaching the game of chess for critical thinking and life strategies.

That's right. Chess is a sport, complete with an Olympiad and chess parents.

Any chess parent will talk your ear off about the benefits of exercising the mind and how curling, the Winter Olympics sport, is just chess on ice. With any sport, you need to have tactics, critical thinking, and quick mental reflexes in play.

The World Chess Olympiad is bigger than the Winter Olympics but smaller than the summer Games in terms of number of nations participating. About 160 nations are expected for the Chess Olympiad set to take place in Istanbul, Turkey, on August 27. The youngest competitor is 10 years old.

The first official Olympiad was held in London in 1927. It was intended for inclusion in the 1924 Olympic Games in Paris, but was not due to difficulties distinguishing between amateur and professional players. So while chess is an IOC recognized sport, the Olympiads have been held separately for the past several decades. During the Bejing Olympics in 2008, there was a failed attempt to merge the games.

Personally, I think the only real obstacle to chess being part of the the Olympic Games is the ability of network TV to cope with coverage and sponsorship. Bob Costas would be learning how to banter about the Alekhine defense and how there's only one woman on the board and she's the most powerful piece. By the way, I would pay to watch this.

I called my friend Susan Polgar, a five-time Olympic chess champion with 10 medals (five gold, four silver, and one bronze), to ask her if chess parents are as intense as other sports parents. Ms. Polgar won her first world title at age 12 and an Olympic gold in 1988 when she was 19. She won her last gold in 2004 at 35. She is undefeated in Olympic competition.

Read further on this link:

http://www.csmonitor.com/The-Culture/Family/Modern-Parenthood/2012/0731/2012-Olympics-Chess-should-be-included-for-players-and-parents

Online Now