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Chess News of 2015 since field 06:Nakamura Brilliant!

Caitano05
Aug 31, 2015, 7:53 AM 0
Sinquefield 06: Nakamura Brilliant!
by Alejandro Ramirez
8/30/2015 – In a showing of excellent attacking chess, Nakamura took So's deep preparation, shredded it over the board and won a brilliant game with multiple sacrifices. So simply seemed to have no clue where the ball was rolling today and was properly punished for it. It was not the only important win today, as MVL and Grischuk also won their games. This puts MVL, Naka and Giri 0.5 from the leaders.
 
2015 Sinquefield Cup
This super-GM single Round Robin brings together some of the best players in the world. This is the second leg of the Grand Chess Tour.
The players – Magnus Carlsen (Norway), Levon Aronian (Armenia), Fabiano Caruana (USA), Hikaru Nakamura (USA), Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria), Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (France), Alexander Grischuk (Russia), Anish Giri (Netherlands), Viswanathan Anand (India), Wesley So (USA).
The venue is the Chess Club and Scholastic Center at 4657 Maryland Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63108. Tickets can be purchased at the Saint Louis Chess Club.
Round Six
Round Six
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Grischuk, Alexander2771
1-0
Caruana, Fabiano2808
Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731
1-0
Topalov, Veselin2816
Giri, Anish2793
½-½
Anand, Viswanathan2816
So, Wesley2779
0-1
Nakamura, Hikaru2814
Aronian, Levon2765
½-½
Carlsen, Magnus2853
Daniel King shows the game of the day from round 6: So vs Nakamura
The hall was packed...
So was downstairs...
and even outside!
What a way to reignite the tournament after the rest day on Friday. The players took it easy and had time to heavily prepare for today’s round. This is an approach that not every grandmaster takes, as some think that too heavy of preparation is counterproductive. Something that we actually had the pleasure of witnessing today!
It is not every day that in a super grandmaster tournament there are so many sacrifices in one round. MVL’s sacrificed a pawn, Caruana sacrificed a piece, but the brilliancy of the round was clearly Nakamura’s sacrifice of basically every piece he had!
The first couple of results of round six were far from interesting. Many predicted that while Aronian would push slightly against Carlsen, he would try to do so with minimal risk and minimal chance of succeeding. In effect, the World Champion was able to equalize without difficulties and the game was drawn.
 Games - CBM 149
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Games - CBM 149
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Aronian, Levon2765–Carlsen, Magnus2853½–½
A293rd Sinquefield Cup 2015629.08.2015Ramirez alvarez,Alejandro
1.c4 e5 2.c3 f6 3.f3 c6 4.g3 d5 5.cxd5 xd5 6.g2 b6 7.0-0 e7 8.d3 0-0 9.a3 e8 10.b4 f8 11.d2 e6 12.b2 A normal version of a reversed Dragon, though there are no games in the database with this exact position! d7 13.ce4 h3 Trading off the dragon bishop is very normal. Black wastes some time on this operation, but it is more than acceptable. 14.xh3
14.b5 d4 15.xh3 xh3 16.a4 was not to Aronian's liking. 
14...xh3 15.b3 d7 16.f3 a5 17.b5 d4 18.xd4
18.xd4 exd4 gives Black the ability to pressure a3 (after a4 from Black) and e2, which should give him enough counterplay. 
18...exd4 19.a4 d5 Carlsen mentioned he didn't know what else to do, this leads to a draw after many trades. 20.xd5 xd5 21.xd4 f5 22.c3 xc3 23.xc3 xe2 so far forced. White has to take care of the active rook. 24.fe1 no Rae8 because a5 is hanging xe1+ 25.xe1 b4 more trades 26.c1 forced
26.xb4 axb4 gives Black an obvious edge in an endgame. 
26...c6 27.bxc6 bxc6 28.xb4 axb4 29.xc6 xa4 the game is very obviously drawn. 30.b6 a1+ 31.g2 d1 32.xb4 xd3
½–½
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Levon Aronian discussing the game with Maurice Ashley
Giri seemed to obtain a slightly more pleasant position from the opening due to his pair of bishops. However, Anand was ultra-solid behind his Slav setup. His control of key dark squares also helped him out in the game. Giri misplayed his position very slightly and allowed Anand to exchange one of his bishops which then resulted in a dead drawn endgame.
Anand's position was uncomfortable for a small amount of time
 The ABC of the Modern Slav 2nd Edition
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The ABC of the Modern Slav 2nd Edition
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Giri, Anish2793–Anand, Viswanathan2816½–½
D113rd Sinquefield Cup 2015629.08.2015Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro
1.d4 d5 2.f3 f6 3.c4 c6 4.e3 g4 5.h3 h5 6.g4 g6 7.e5 bd7 8.xg6 hxg6 9.g2 White's pair of bishops guarantees him long-term prospects, but Black will always remain solid. e6 10.d2 g5 11.0-0 e7 12.e1 f8 13.e4 xe4 14.xe4 dxe4 15.xe4 g6 White's advantage in the center is somewhat offset by Black's dark-squared control. 16.e3 0-0 17.d5 White has to break through at some point, of course. cxd5 18.cxd5 e5 Black wants to keep the center closed to restrain the light square bishop.
18...xd5 19.xd5 exd5 20.a4! Will eventually regain the d5 pawn, with a slight advantage. 
19.d2 a5 20.d6
20.a3 was considered by Giri, keeping the tension, but it is unclear how to proceed after Qd6. 
20...xd6 21.xd6 xd6 22.xg5
22.d1 e7 23.d7
23.c4! is some computer find that gives Giri some opportunity for an edge. 
23...b5?!
23...b6! close to equal. 
24.xe7!? xe7 25.xe5 with chances for the advantage as all of Black's pawns are hanging. 
22...ac8 23.e2 b6 24.d1 c5 White's pair of bishops unfortunately will be neutralized by a strong knight on f4. Then the opposite colored bishops makes the position closer to a draw than anything else, even if White retains a small advantage. 25.e4 f4 26.xf4 exf4 27.g2 fd8 28.ed2 xd2 29.xd2 g5 30.d7 e8 31.f3 e7 White has no good way of making progress. 32.xe7
½–½
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Wesley So having a dark tournament
Wesley So played a very strange game. He confidently blitzed out twenty moves of theory, clearly prepared. Unfortunately, after that every move he played lasted at least fifteen minutes and were rather unconvincing. At one point it was clear that he had violated a couple of positional rules, or maybe twenty, and he was punished with a brilliancy. Nakamura sacrificed everything, including the kitchen sink, and mated So on g6 in a must-see game.
a masterpiece
 A World Champion's Guide to the King's Indian (2nd Edition)
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So, Wesley2779–Nakamura, Hikaru28140–1
E993rd Sinquefield Cup 2015629.08.2015Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro
1.d4 f6 2.c4 g6 3.c3 g7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 0-0 6.e2 e5 7.0-0 c6 8.d5 e7 9.e1 d7 10.f3 f5 11.e3 f4 12.f2 g5 13.d3 g6 14.c5 f6 15.c1 f7 16.h1 h5 17.cxd6 cxd6 18.b5 a6 19.a3 b5 20.c6 Up to this point So had played instantly. This is surprising as he has achieved nothing on the queenside. Nakamura continues his kingside attack. g4 21.c2 f8 22.c1 d7 23.c7? I don't like this move at all. Releasing the tension on d6 and a6 is too lenient on Black's position. Asked after the game what they thought of Wesley's play, most of the players agreed that it looked completely wrong and anti-positional. "If it was White to move, I would consider playing Rc6 here" - Anish Giri.
23.b4! xc6
23...h6 
23...h6 24.e1 removing the bishop from potential g3 moves with tempo. h4 here the pawn on g4 is clearly poisoned to an experience KID player. 25.fxg4 picking up the gauntlet, this is not good. That being said, I don't know what else he could have done. f3 26.gxf3 xe4 27.d1? This makes things esay for Nakamura to calculate as almost every line wins.
27.xd7 was a much better try. xf3! works anyway
27...xd7 28.fxe4± 
28.xf3 xf3+ 29.g2 xd3 30.d1 d2‼ is the key move. Nakamura did not see this, but he would have found that h3 instead of Bd2 was favorable for Black, and upon reaching this position probably would have found Bd2. 31.xd2 f4 and White is getting mated. 
27.f2 xf2+ 28.xf2 xc1 29.xg6+ g7 
27.c5! dxc5 28.xd7 xd7 29.xe4 xc1 30.xg6+ g7-+ 
27...xf3 28.xd7
28.xf3 xf3+ 29.g2 xg4 is completely winning. 
28...f1+! 29.g2 e3! A very nice resource. There were other winning moves, but this is fantastic.
29...h3+ 30.xh3 f2 was even more fantastic, and just as winning. 31.xf2 xf2 32.xf2 f4+ 33.h4 g5# 
30.g3
30.h3 f4+ 31.h2 xd3 and with the elimination of the knight on d3 White's dark squares fall apart. 
30...hxg3 31.xf1 h4+ 32.h3 h6 White is up a rook, but his position is hopeless. He is simply getting mated. 33.g5 xg5+ The rest is a forced mating sequence. 34.g4 every move wins here. hf3 35.f2 h4+ 36.f5 f8+ 37.g6 f6+! pretty but not the only way. 38.xf6 e4+ 39.g6 g5#
0–1
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Naka is 1/2 behind the leaders, same as Giri and MVL
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave was able to outplay Topalov in a very clean game. It was almost a perfect Berlin endgame from White in which Black’s pieces were never able to coordinate. White got a brilliantly timed e6 break, and everything just went south for the Bulgarian. MVL cleaned up without problems.
 My best games in the Spanish Vol. 1
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My best games in the Spanish Vol. 1
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Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime2731–Topalov, Veselin28161–0
C673rd Sinquefield Cup 2015629.08.2015Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro
1.e4 e5 2.f3 c6 3.b5 f6 4.0-0 xe4 5.d4 d6 6.xc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 f5 8.xd8+ xd8 9.h3 h6 10.d1+ e8 11.c3 e7 12.d4
12.b3 was the famous game Caruana-Carlsen from Norway this year. MVL has other ideas in mind. 
12...g6 13.f4 c5 14.e3 h5 15.e4 xd4 16.xd4 h4
16...f5 17.g3 xc2 18.c1 h4 19.xc2 hxg3 20.f1∞ 
16...b6 17.ad1 f5 18.g3 xc2 19.c1 
17.ad1 f5 18.e6 It is unclear if the players knew so, but this has been all played so far. Considering that MVL spent 50 minutes to get to this position, it is unlikely that he knew it, but Maurice Ashley thinks that MVL had prepped it all! I digress, however. xe6
18...fxe6 19.c5 b6 20.a6 c8
20...e5 21.fxe5 c8 22.e6 
21.d7 e5 22.xc7+ f8 
19.c5 h5
19...b6 20.xe6 fxe6 21.d7 e7 22.xc7 was clearly better for White in Saric-Sulava, 2011. 
19...c8 20.xb7± 
20.xb7 d5
20...b5 21.d8 d5 22.c4 xb2 23.cxd5 xd8 24.e4+ f8 25.f5 h8 26.xh4 g8 27.d4 xd5 28.g4 
21.b3 b8 22.xd5 cxd5 23.c5 This is very unpleasant for Black. h4 is a long term weakness, his bishop is bad and his a7 pawn is also weak. c6 24.d4 c8 25.a4 a8 no one ever wants to play this, but life sucks sometimes over the board. 26.c4 dxc4 27.xc4 f5 28.b7 d7 29.d4+ even the king feels unsafe. Not a good thing with opposite colored bishops in the position. c7 30.d6 b1 31.xf7 e8 32.f2 xa2 33.f5 f8 Black's position is clearly collapsing. He has no coordination, his king is weak, his pawns are falling. MVL has his choice of coup de grace. 34.a4 xb3 35.xa7+
35.f4+ was even easier. 
35...b8 36.d6 d8 37.xg7
1–0
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MVL admitted to not knowing the Saric game in the postmortem
Last to finish was a thrilling battle between Grischuk and Caruana which left the American player unhappy. He played a strong and resourceful piece sacrifice to shatter his opponent’s structure and obtain a lasting initiative, but his misplayed it badly. His move b5?! simply helped his opponent’s queen to improve, and though it is true that the correct continuation was scary, he simply had to go for it. As the game progressed, it became obvious that White was simply up a piece.
You know something is up when Grischuk has more time than his opponent
 Queen's Gambit Declined
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Queen's Gambit Declined
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Grischuk, Alexander2771–Caruana, Fabiano28081–0
D373rd Sinquefield Cup 2015629.08.2015Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro
1.d4 1 f6 2.c4 e6 3.f3 d5 4.c3 e7 5.f4 0-0 6.e3 bd7 7.c5 e4 8.a3 Grischuk played this move very quickly, but it is not the most logical move. The move itself doesn't threaten b4 yet, but it does cover against b6 since b4 is not available for the bishop on e7.
8.c2 and 
8.c1 have been seen before, in this tournament included. 
8...xc3 9.bxc3 c6 10.a4 g5! 11.g3 f5 This expansion seems completely justified. White loses development time and Black grabs space. 12.h3 f4 13.h2 e5 14.e2 e4! 15.d2 xc5! Excellent decision making from Caruana. This piece sacrifice nets him two pawns and a strong initiative, using his pawns as spear points. Grischuk was playing quickly up to this point, but went into a long thin after accepting the knight. 16.dxc5 xc5 17.0-0!?
17.exf4 gxf4 18.xe4 dxe4 19.xe4 is incredibly messy, with both kings feeling unsafe. 
17...b5?! After a very long thing, Caruana played this move which seems bizarre to me. Why improve White's queen?
17...fxe3 18.xe4 dxe4 19.fxe3
19.b3+ g7 20.e5+ h6
20...g6 21.fxe3 d5 
21.fxe3 
19.xe4 exf2+ 20.h1 
19...xe3+?!
19...e6! Perhaps Caruana missed this. After which Black has all the trumps in the position, for example 20.xe4 d5 
20.h1 gives Black two extra pawns but the position remains very unclear. White's initiative is real. 
18.b3 e7 19.h1 e6 Again after a long thing. Black has compensation for his missing piece but his initiative evaporated. 20.a4! Allowing d4, which actually doesn't do anything. d4 21.d1 d3 22.g4 d5 23.axb5 cxb5 24.b3 fxe3
24...b6 25.d4± 
25.xc5 xc5
25...e2 26.xe2 dxe2 27.xd5+ doesn't work. 
26.fxe3 At the end of the day, White simply has an extra bishop. xe3 27.e1 f2 28.g1 f7 29.d2 g6 30.a6! A nice touch. f6
30...xa6 31.xg5+ g6 32.xd5+ basically gets mated. 
31.ea1! Salt in the wound. e8 32.xf6 xf6 33.xa7 h6 34.e3 e5 35.e1 c4 36.d4 f4 37.g7+ f8 38.a1 b4 This move was on the board, but not played. Caruana flagged before he could make his move, but he was getting mated anyway.
1–0
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Standings
Round Six Games
 My best games in the Spanish Vol. 1
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My best games in the Spanish Vol. 1
by Alexei Shirov
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Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime2731–Topalov, Veselin28161–0
C673rd Sinquefield Cup 2015629.08.2015Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro
1.e4 e5 2.f3 c6 3.b5 f6 4.0-0 xe4 5.d4 d6 6.xc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 f5 8.xd8+ xd8 9.h3 h6 10.d1+ e8 11.c3 e7 12.d4
12.b3 was the famous game Caruana-Carlsen from Norway this year. MVL has other ideas in mind. 
12...g6 13.f4 c5 14.e3 h5 15.e4 xd4 16.xd4 h4
16...f5 17.g3 xc2 18.c1 h4 19.xc2 hxg3 20.f1∞ 
16...b6 17.ad1 f5 18.g3 xc2 19.c1 
17.ad1 f5 18.e6 It is unclear if the players knew so, but this has been all played so far. Considering that MVL spent 50 minutes to get to this position, it is unlikely that he knew it, but Maurice Ashley thinks that MVL had prepped it all! I digress, however. xe6
18...fxe6 19.c5 b6 20.a6 c8
20...e5 21.fxe5 c8 22.e6 
21.d7 e5 22.xc7+ f8 
19.c5 h5
19...b6 20.xe6 fxe6 21.d7 e7 22.xc7 was clearly better for White in Saric-Sulava, 2011. 
19...c8 20.xb7± 
20.xb7 d5
20...b5 21.d8 d5 22.c4 xb2 23.cxd5 xd8 24.e4+ f8 25.f5 h8 26.xh4 g8 27.d4 xd5 28.g4 
21.b3 b8 22.xd5 cxd5 23.c5 This is very unpleasant for Black. h4 is a long term weakness, his bishop is bad and his a7 pawn is also weak. c6 24.d4 c8 25.a4 a8 no one ever wants to play this, but life sucks sometimes over the board. 26.c4 dxc4 27.xc4 f5 28.b7 d7 29.d4+ even the king feels unsafe. Not a good thing with opposite colored bishops in the position. c7 30.d6 b1 31.xf7 e8 32.f2 xa2 33.f5 f8 Black's position is clearly collapsing. He has no coordination, his king is weak, his pawns are falling. MVL has his choice of coup de grace. 34.a4 xb3 35.xa7+
35.f4+ was even easier. 
35...b8 36.d6 d8 37.xg7
1–0
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Photos by Lennart Ootes
Pairings
Round One
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Giri, Anish2793
1-0
Grischuk, Alexander2771
So, Wesley2779
0-1
Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731
Aronian, Levon2765
1-0
Caruana, Fabiano2808
Carlsen, Magnus2853
0-1
Topalov, Veselin2816
Nakamura, Hikaru2814
1-0
Anand, Viswanathan2816
Round Two
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Grischuk, Alexander2771
1-0
Anand, Viswanathan2816
Topalov, Veselin2816
1-0
Nakamura, Hikaru2814
Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731
½-½
Aronian, Levon2765
Giri, Anish2793
½-½
So, Wesley2779
Caruana, Fabiano2808
0-1
Carlsen, Magnus2853
Round Three
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
So, Wesley2779
1-0
Grischuk, Alexander2771
Aronian, Levon2765
½-½
Giri, Anish2793
Carlsen, Magnus2853
1-0
Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731
Nakamura, Hikaru2814
½-½
Caruana, Fabiano2808
Anand, Viswanathan2816
½-½
Topalov, Veselin2816
Round Four
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Grischuk, Alexander2771
½-½
Topalov, Veselin2816
Caruana, Fabiano2808
½-½
Anand, Viswanathan2816
Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731
½-½
Nakamura, Hikaru2814
Giri, Anish2793
½-½
Carlsen, Magnus2853
So, Wesley2779
0-1
Aronian, Levon2765
Round Five
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Aronian, Levon2765
½-½
Grischuk, Alexander2771
Carlsen, Magnus2853
1-0
So, Wesley2779
Nakamura, Hikaru2814
½-½
Giri, Anish2793
Anand, Viswanathan2816
½-½
Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731
Topalov, Veselin2816
0-1
Caruana, Fabiano2808
Round Six
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Grischuk, Alexander2771
1-0
Caruana, Fabiano2808
Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731
1-0
Topalov, Veselin2816
Giri, Anish2793
½-½
Anand, Viswanathan2816
So, Wesley2779
0-1
Nakamura, Hikaru2814
Aronian, Levon2765
½-½
Carlsen, Magnus2853
Round Seven
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Carlsen, Magnus2853Grischuk, Alexander2771
Nakamura, Hikaru2814Aronian, Levon2765
Anand, Viswanathan2816So, Wesley2779
Topalov, Veselin2816Giri, Anish2793
Caruana, Fabiano2808Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731
Round Eight
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Grischuk, Alexander2771Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731
Giri, Anish2793Caruana, Fabiano2808
So, Wesley2779Topalov, Veselin2816
Aronian, Levon2765Anand, Viswanathan2816
Carlsen, Magnus2853Nakamura, Hikaru2814
Round Nine
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Nakamura, Hikaru2814Grischuk, Alexander2771
Anand, Viswanathan2816Carlsen, Magnus2853
Topalov, Veselin2816Aronian, Levon2765
Caruana, Fabiano2808So, Wesley2779
Vachier-Lagr, Maxime2731Giri, Anish2793
Games start at 1 p.m. local time (20:00h CEST, 22:00h Moscow, Thursday 12:30 New Delhi, 03:00h Tokyo, 04:00 Canberra – check your location here).
Playoffs, if necessary, will be on the 2nd at 1pm.
The games will be broadcast live on Playchess, with expert analysis (see schedule below).
Broadcast Schedule
DayDateTimeEventGerman
English
SundayAug. 231 PMRound 1Thomas Luther  
Mihail Marin
MondayAug. 241 PMRound 2Calrstedt/Pähtz
Mihail Marin
TuesdayAug. 251 PMRound 3S. Siebrecht  
Simon Williams
WednesdayAug. 261 PMRound 4S. Siebrecht  
Simon Williams
ThursdayAug. 271 PMRound 5S. Siebrecht  
Simon Williams
FridayAug. 28Rest Day
SaturdayAug. 291 PMRound 6Reeh/Breutigam
Y. Pelletier
SundayAug. 301 PMRound 7Reeh/Breutigam
Y. Pelletier
MondayAug. 311 PMRound 8S. Siebrecht  
Daniel King
TuesdaySept. 11 PMRound 9Y. Pelletier
Daniel King
WednesdaySept. 21 PMPlayoffs
 
Links
Official tournament site
Download all games on PGN
The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.
 
 
Alejandro Ramirez
Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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Topics
Sinquefield
See also
 
Sinquefield 07: Aronian's day
8/31/2015 – What a day for the Armenian celebrity, former number two in the world: Levon Aronian was the biggest winner today with a fine positional victory against Hikaru Nakamura. In the meantime, Magnus Carlsen saw his dreams of a comeback hamstrung as he lost a dramatic game against Alexander Grischuk in a long endgame that went down to the final seconds! Discuss
 
Sinquefield 05: Topalov loses, Carlsen resurges
8/28/2015 – The tournament has become an even tighter race. Topalov had a fantastic start with 3.0/4 and played very strong chess, but Fabiano Caruana, who had a rough start with 0.0/2, has beaten the Bulgarian, escaped from the basement and Topalov is no longer leading. With Carlsen winning yet another game, the Norwegian is now tied for first with Aronian, who drew Grischuk. Discuss
Discuss
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