Being Out-Dutched - A Dangerous Coffee House Gambit Line!

Being Out-Dutched - A Dangerous Coffee House Gambit Line!

FangBo
FangBo
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4
I am not going to beat around the bush, in this game I basically got out classed. This guy I was playing against was clearly experienced, and knew his way around the chess board.
If you have never heard of the 4 Nations Chess League, then you are either not British, or you don`t play chess (probably both). Essentially, they host national congresses every month or so across the country, and I thought I would show my face. 
Back to the game. In my previous game, I lost despite being a rook up at one point. Shocking I know, well these things can happen when you have but 10 minutes on the clock against 40! I am in some good company though, because GM Peter Wells, who was playing in the open section was down to 1 minute 30 seconds against 15 minutes of his opponent. This is quite shocking, even when there was 30 seconds increment. 
What I am trying to say is that after my round 2 travesty, I was itching for revenge. As Garry Kasparov said in his book 'Deep Thinking', the worst thing you can do is let a loss cost you more than 1 point'. One must strive to find the balance between completely forgetting about a game, and analysing it excessively between rounds, which tires you out. Perhaps the best option is to save the heavy analysis until you get back from congress. After all, you aren`t going to face the same opponent twice in a swiss tournament....
Every Dutch player (not the nationality) knows that your light squares can become undermined, because the move f7-f5 - what defines the Dutch - weakens the f7 light square in front of your king. Many of the gambit lines, for example the Staunton, the Korchnoi attack, and various other ones all attack on these squares with moves like Qd3 and Bd3 and Nf3-Ng5 manoeuvres, My main mistake in this game was that I played too passively. I have learnt that sometimes it is better to sacrifice a pawn, to keep your pieces active, and to regain the initiative. Active play is quintessential to the Dutch. Don`t play an aggressive opening and then shy away from the flames. If anything, throw more wood on the fire. Keep your opponent on their toes, and the pressure on them. 
I am hoping that my future opponents won`t use this analysis against me... But I will include it. First of all though, I think a few tactical permutations of the game is in order, to give you some exercise!
Tactic #1 - Easy
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Black to move and lose
Tactic #2 - Medium
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White to move and win
Tactic #3 - Difficult
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White to move and win
Here is the game....
See you later! happy.png
Quite literally if you are drawn against me in a tournament!