The Crazy Scandinavian

Fear_ItseIf
Fear_ItseIf
Mar 17, 2013, 1:46 AM |
0

Many people know of the Scandinavian (1.e4 d5). Some may also know of the Gambit lines following 2.exd5 and nf6, which will be the focus of this post.

In this blog I would like to share and discuss some of the crazy but fun lines in the Scandinavian. This blog will mainly focus on the black side , as its what i play, but some white options will be considered as well.

Many of these have been seldom played by masters, but are quite interesting.

First we will start with one of whites options, namely the Zilbermints gambit. This seems to be an attempt to get into a win gambit, which is often played in the advance french:

The next line is called the Kadas gambit, it has only been played once in chess coms database but looks very interesting:

In the chess com game database

White: Gountintas Anton (2300)
Black: Ward Wesley (2210)

Black got a crushing victory against his opponent who was rated 100 points higher!, a very interesting game to look at. It seems to have exeptional suprise value but gives white too much if he knows what he is doing.

The next opening is called the wing gambit. This wing gambit arises in the mainline of the modern scandinavian (2..nf6). The mainline can often be dreary to play and this is a refreshing take on the position.

I hope to use this in some of my games. There is  8 master games played in this variation, which I find suprising for such an odd line and while it is too small a statistical smaple to draw conclusions black has won about 50%.

This next line, named the kiel variation follows the mainline with 3.d4 a move furthur before leaving the beaten track with the suprising 4.nb4?!

This variation has 36 master games played! with black scoring about 50%. perhaps something to try in one of your games.



These are a few of the interesting gambits in the scandinavian defense I just thought I would quickly share. I intend to test these lines in my own play and possibly post some game analysis on my favourite variations.