Winning with the Pseudo-Alapin (or Why Is It Good to Go Out of Book Early)

Winning with the Pseudo-Alapin (or Why Is It Good to Go Out of Book Early)

GIex
GIex
Oct 18, 2014, 11:28 AM |
5

This game is an example of how playing a suboptimal line can be useful if you get your opponent out of the positions he's comfortable with. After 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 with White I decided to avoid the most-studied Sicilian lines, but I also gave Black an extra tempo. I chose 3.d3 to play a Closed Sicilian, but then changed my mind as this is also a known line, and "transposed" into an Alapin-like position with 4.c3. Achieving d4 in two moves instead of one - 3.d2-d3 and 5.d3-d4, I lost a tempo, and that extra move was an advantage for Black. The only reason that I won this game I can think of is that I led the play out-of-book. Instead of looking for a way to exploit his advantage, Black didn't play actively enough, made some inappropriate for the position moves and even unprovokedly weakened his king. I caught up with dvelopment, gained space, organized an attack and won by checkmate. This reversal shows how important it is to pay attention to the specificity of what's going on on the board, to play positions you're comfortable with, and to avoid those your opponent is likely to prefer.