Performance Rating Top 15 2019: Carlsen stellar, Artemiev rising star
Caruana - Carlsen at Altibox Norway Chess Blitz

Performance Rating Top 15 2019: Carlsen stellar, Artemiev rising star

HanSchut
NM HanSchut
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Two days ago FIDE published the June classical rating list. In the table below you can find the top 15 players of the world, their June and January FIDE rating and their performance rating over the first 5 months of this year. This overview focuses just on classical chess and does not include rapid or blitz results.

Magnus Carlsen is having a stellar year so far. He won Grenke, Shamkir and Tata with a performance rating of 2945! He is only 7 points from his peak rating and breaking the 2900 barrier is no longer unrealistic. Carlsen remained undefeated in classical chess in the first 5 months of 2019.

Vladislav Artemiev (21 years old) entered the top 10 for the first time.  In January he won Gibraltar ahead of Vachier Lagrave, Nakamura and So. In March he won the European Championships in Macedonia. In the 38 games he played in the first 5 month, he scored an impressive 80% against an average 2603 opposition and did not lose a single classical game. That is scoring 4 out of 5, more than 7 times in a row against 2600+. Quite a butcher! Artemiev's performance rating was 2843, the second highest of the world.

Biggest loser was Mamedyarov who had bad results in Tata, Shamkir and at the FIDE Grand Prix, where he got eliminated in the first round by Wojtaszek. Is he having difficulty to stay motivated after he just missed out on qualification for the world chess championship match in 2018? A second place in the candidates can hurt.

Number 2 in the world Fabiano Caruana basically performed on his (high) level except for one game that he lost in the German Bundesliga for his team Baden-Baden against Peter Leko. 

Anish Giri won his first super-tournament in Shenzen and finished second behind Carlsen in Tata with 8.5 out of 11 despite a painful first round loss with White against  Nepomniachtchi. He lost rating points by losing to Dubov in the first round of the FIDE Grand Prix. and in Shamkir (Gashimov memorial) where he finished last with 3 out of 9. 

Alexander Grischuk, finalist in the FIDE Grand Prix, had two impressive wins in that tournament in regular time control against Nakamura and Karjakin.

 

 

 

Fide - June

Fide - Jan

FIDE June - FIDE Jan

Perf Rating

Perf Rat – FIDE June

# Games

1

 Carlsen

 NOR

2875

2835

40

2945

70

31

2

 Caruana

 USA

2819

2828

-9

2789

-30

23

3

 Liren

 CHN

2805

2813

-8

2798

-7

40

4

 Vachier-Lagrave

 FRA

2779

2780

-1

2763

-16

31

5

 Giri

 NED

2779

2783

-4

2781

2

34

6

 Grischuk

RUS

2775

2771

4

2778

3

28

7

 Nepomniachtchi

RUS

2775

2763

12

2799

24

27

8

 Mamedyarov

 AZE

2774

2817

-43

2690

-84

27

9

 Anand

 IND

2767

2773

-6

2763

-4

34

10

 Artemiev

RUS

2761

2709

52

2843

82

38

11

 Dominguez Perez

USA

2760

2739

21

2831

71

18

12

 Radjabov

AZE

2759

2757

2

2764

5

24

13

 Nakamura

USA

2754

2749

5

2755

1

27

14

 So

USA

2753

2765

-12

2723

-30

25

15

 Kramnik

RUS

2752

2777

-25

2641

-111

13

Perf rating is the performance rating over the first 5 months of  2019 and is based FIDE information.

Leinier Dominguez, who switched federations from Cuba to the USA, performed strongly at his first US Champsionship and at the Russian Team Championships.

Viswanathan Anand was able to hold on to his top 10 spot despite having less consistent results. He lost in the first 5 months against Naiditsch, Meier, Korobov, Karjakin and Carlsen (2x).

Hikaru Nakamura won the US Championships with an impressive 8 out 11 in a strong field that included Caruana, Dominguez and So. In Gibraltar he lost from the winner Artemiev and had a slow start drawing 2 2400 players. In the FIDE Grand Prix he lost in the semi-finals against Grischuk in one of the best games of the year.

Vladimir Kramnik announced his retirement in January after the Tata tournament. In an interview after the tournament he stated: "I felt I could no longer give my all. I still, as before, have a real love for chess, but I suddenly began to feel that the result of a game had stopped bothering me as much as it had until only very recently. And with such an attitude, that comes from somewhere within, it’s hard to count on good sporting results."

Kramnik at the Tata Steel Chess Tournament