Why Does God Allow Disasters?

JD-ex
JD-ex
Jul 1, 2016, 10:04 PM |
11

by HJS

On Good Friday, 1964, a violent earthquake with a magnitude of 9.2 destroyed much of Anchorage, Alaska. People asked, "Why did God allow this?" Yet this destruction pales in comparison to the hundreds of thousands who lost their lives when the vicious tsunami struck Asia on December 24, 2004. Yet these numbers are a fraction of the fourteen million who died in the concentration camps of Europe during World War 2.

When tragedy strikes, its extent may vary. But when it's personal, the intensity of its impact is always the same. When it is your loss, the issue is personal, intimate and very painful.

And again we ask, "Why did God allow this?"

First, God's decision not to intervene in every act of wrongdoing isn't the result of His helplessness or weakness. It's His choice, allowing the consequences of the human will to take its toll indiscriminately on the good as well as the evil, the strong as well as the weak. On the cross even God's Son said that He could summon twelve legions of angels to give Him assistance, but He didn't (Matthew 26:53). 

God promises to be with His children when they walk the deep waters, the dark valleys and when they face the fire. This promise is for His children alone and is backed by the integrity of God.

As David said long ago, "Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, i will fear no evil for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me" (Psalm 23:4, KJV). It is comforting to know that the Shepherd still walks with His children through dark valley.

 

Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.  PSALM 23:4 KJV