Bronstein's Bishop Battery Baffles Veresov! - Best Of The 60s - Veresov vs. Bronstein, 1960

Bronstein's Bishop Battery Baffles Veresov! - Best Of The 60s - Veresov vs. Bronstein, 1960

SamCopeland
NM SamCopeland
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16

GM David Bronstein came within a hair of becoming world chess champion in 1951. In addition to leading the match with Botvinnik most of the way, the concluding result was a draw, 12-12, leaving the world title in the hands of Botvinnik, the current champion.

In addition to being a tremendous chess player, Bronstein was a tremendous chess explainer. His book about the Zurich 1953 tournament is widely considered the best tournament book ever written, and his writings on his own games, "Sorcerer's Apprentice" and "Secret Notes," are at least as invigorating and far more personal.

In his game against Veresov, perfect and incisive play is capped by a striking remaneuver.

Top 10 Games of the 1960s

Veresov is known for his direct attacking play, and he tries to achieve that in this game with a rapid 9.0-0-0, but it turns out that he is overreaching. With a series of instructive and vigorous moves (11...Nb4!, 14...0-0!, and 16...Be4!), Bronstein surrenders a pawn, but ties Veresov down. It is his concluding idea of 17...h6!! and 18...Bh7!! that has impressed chess strategists around the world.

My annotations with some of Bronstein's comments from Sorcerer's Apprentice (Amazon affiliate link supports the content.) are below.

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