How To Punish A Chess Opening Error! - Best Of The 50s - Beylin vs. Lipnitsky, 1950
A little-known gem!

How To Punish A Chess Opening Error! - Best Of The 50s - Beylin vs. Lipnitsky, 1950

SamCopeland
NM SamCopeland
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10

Coming in at number eight on my list of the best chess games of the 1950s is a little-known gem contested between Mikhail Beylin and Isaac Lipnitsky from 1950. While many may not know Lipnitsky, in this year he finished second in the Soviet Championship to the great Paul Keres, a huge achievement. Lipnitsky was also twice Ukrainian champion, and he wrote the classic book "Questions of Modern Chess Theory." This excellent book was recently republished with an excellent translation by Quality Chess.

Top 10 Games of the 1950s

The game actually follows fairly forcing lines after an early opening error in 8.Ne5? The move is not yet losing, but Beylin has little room for error from then on. When he decided on the greedy 14.d5? and 15.Qxc7 instead of the sturdier 14.e4!, Lipnitsky initiated a fantastic winning sequence in which he sacrificed his bishop to bury the White king with the beautiful ...17.e3!!

My annotations are available below with key comments from Lipnitsky's classic work, "Questions of Modern Chess Theory." [Amazon affiliate link supports content.]

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