Anderssen

batgirl
batgirl
Dec 30, 2008, 3:59 PM |
6

While researching for this posting, I examined various online biographies of Adolf Anderssen. Most all of the better ones were sufficiently detailed and accurate as far as I could determine, but in my (totally unbiased, of course) opinion, the best of the lot is my own - Adolf Anderssen.
One thing I didn't mention in my bio, which Max Lange happened to mention in his short biographical notes on Anderssen in his book on Morphy , was that Anderssen, who studied philospophy as well as mathematics, was particularly attracted to the simplistic doctrines of Immanuel Kant.

But this posting isn't intended to recount the details of Anderssen's life or chess accomplishments but rather to bring to the reader's attention a facet of Anderssen's chess talent that is well known but too often ignored.  Anderssen first attracted the eye of the chess world by publishing a book of 60 chess problems in 1842. Ten years later, after having won the 1st International Chess Tournament, held in London in 1851; after his Immortal Game of 1851 and his Evergreen Game of 1852 were part of history, Anderssen re-published (with a new Foreward) the fairly large book of problems, harkening back to his beginnings.

His book was entitled Aufgaben für Schachspieler nebst ihren Lösungen and contained Mates-in-three, Mates-in-four, Mates-in-five, Mates-in-six and even a Mate-in-eight and a Mate-in-nine.


I selected 3 sample 3-movers from the beginning of the book that I found rather simple yet elegant - Kantian, I suppose.

 

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