Your Games Analyzed Endgame Edition

Your Games Analyzed Endgame Edition

dpruess
IM dpruess
Jan 14, 2010, 4:38 PM |
9

I looked forward to Episode 16 of Your Games Analyzed with some trepidation. For the sake of variety, I had decided to leave my own comfort zone with an "Endgame Edition." And the game that ended up on our plates was... every bit as incredible and difficult as I could have dreamed. First of all I want to thank Avrmia for providing us with such excellent material for our program-- and for answering the day's question in less time than my internet lag. ("What famous tournament begins in two days?" check2008 and roepstoep also answered correctly within a second).

The big question for this game was: "where did black go wrong?" Black seemed to get a fairly solid and defensible position, going quickly into the endgame, and yet lost without being aware of making any substantial error. Well, we were not quite able to answer that question, though we did start on it, despite spending two hours (! instead of our usual one) on the game. Perhaps after playing through it, and the variations we looked at during the program) you can try your own hand at answering that question. Also noteworthy is that this was the first game in *ages* that a viewer presented a game in which they had lost; and it happened to be one of our most interesting and instructive sessions. Really a fascinating game:

If you should have any energy left after studying that game (or come back later), here is the game we looked at last week, a much easier Irregular Defense, which shows what thin ice black skates on in irregular openings, if white reacts energetically:

The next episode of Your Games Analyzed will air next Thursday, again at its new time of 2 pm pacific. Hope to see you there! IM Mark Ginsburg will also be hosting his "Thinking Your Way to Chess Mastery" this coming Monday at 2 pm as usual; check his blog (http://blog.chess.com/seventhrank) for study materials.

Also, the answer to today's question was that in two days, the Corus Wijk Aan Zee tournament begins, with the top group boasting a field of Carlsen, Anand, Kramnik, Ivanchuk, Leko, Shirov, Karjakin, Dominguez, Nakamura, Short, Caruana, Tiviakov, Smeets, and Van Wely. There is also a strong 'B' group, and a 'C' group full of mini-masters, young GMs from all around the world. We will have live coverage of a few rounds on chess.com/tv, so be sure to check the schedule at the bottom of that page, to come watch and discuss the games with your fellow chess.com members and special master commentators.

Blogs