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Chess960

Chess960

jimthemagic
Nov 8, 2010, 9:21 AM 1

“Chess960 is healthy and good for your chess. If you get into it and not just move the pieces to achieve known positions it really improves your chess vision.”
- GM Levon Aronian

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chess960, or Fischer Random Chess, is a chess variant invented by former World Champion Bobby Fischer. It uses the same board and pieces as standard chess but the starting position of the main pieces is chosen at random. Randomizing the main pieces has long been known as Shuffle Chess but Chess960 also introduces new rules so that castling possibilities exist for all starting positions, resulting in 960 possible non-mirrored starting positions. To maintain the character of standard chess, the king must start somewhere between the two rooks, and the bishops must start on opposite color squares. It was originally announced on June 19, 1996, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The random setup makes creativity and talent more important than memorization of opening moves.

 

Summary table

Year

World Fischer Random Chess Championship

Mainz Open

World Fischer Random Chess Women's Championship

Computer Championship

2001

Péter Lékó (4.5-3.5 vs Michael Adams)

-

-

-

2002

-

Peter Svidler

-

-

2003

Peter Svidler (4.5-3.5 vs Péter Lékó)

Levon Aronian

-

-

2004

Peter Svidler (4.5-3.5 vs Levon Aronian)

Zoltán Almási

-

-

2005

Peter Svidler (5-3 vs Zoltán Almási)

Levon Aronian

-

Spike

2006

Levon Aronian (5-3 vs Peter Svidler)

Étienne Bacrot

Alexandra Kosteniuk (5.5-2.5 vs Elisabeth Pähtz)

Shredder

2007

Levon Aronian (2-2, 1.5-0.5 vs Viswanathan Anand)

Victor Bologan

-

Rybka

2008

-

Hikaru Nakamura

Alexandra Kosteniuk (2.5-1.5 vs Kateryna Lahno)

Rybka

2009

Hikaru Nakamura (3.5-0.5 vs Levon Aronian)

Alexander Grischuk

-

Rybka

 

     
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

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