Learning from the Elders, Part 1- Rook on the 7th Rank

kamalakanta
kamalakanta
Apr 19, 2016, 5:43 AM |
1
We have all heard about the dangers of allowing the opponent's rook on its seventh rank...I just want to illustrate this point with three games in which the presence of the rook in the 7th rank had a decisive effect in the outcome of the game. The first game is a win by Janowski over Tarrasch in 1905.
"David (Dawid) Markelowicz Janowski was born in 1868 in Wolkowysk, Poland, and circa 1890 he relocated to France. His chess career began in Paris when he won the city championship, and in the late 1890s he started receiving a steady stream of invitations to international events. Janowski finished in third place in the Vienna tournament of 1898 and second at London the following year. In 1905, he was second with Tarrash at the huge master tournament,
Ostend 1905"- from chessgames.com
David Janowski
David Bronstein
"David Ionovich Bronstein was born February 19, 1924 in Bila Tserkva, Ukraine. He died on December 5, 2006

Bronstein made many contributions to theory in openings such as the Ruy Lopez, King's Indian, and Caro-Kann (e.g. the Bronstein-Larsen variation 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nf6 5.Nxf6 gxf6). He helped revive the King's gambit,1 and also wrote a popular book on one of his favorite weapons: Bronstein On the King's Indian. Although Bronstein preferred some systems over others, the following recollection from biographer Tom F├╝rstenberg is worth keeping in mind: "David explained many times that he doesn't play openings - he just starts to create an attack... from the first move! ...That is why he does not have a specific opening repertoire. He just plays everything!"

"The art of a chess player consists in his ability to ignite a magical fire from the dull and senseless initial position."
--David Ionovich Bronstein
(quoted from chessgames.com)

Mikhail Botvinnik
MIKHAIL BOTVINNIK
(born Aug-17-1911, died May-05-1995, 83 years old) Russia

"Mikhail Moiseevich Botvinnik was born in Kuokkala, near Viipuri (Today, Vyborg) in what was then Finland. He was raised in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg). He learned the game early and progressed rapidly, winning the 1st of his 6 USSR Championships in 1931; the other 5 victories were in 1933, 1939, 1944, 1945 and 1952. He also won the Leningrad tournament of 1934, the Absolute Soviet Championship in 1941, and the Sverdlovsk super tournament of 1943. Other significant achievements include equal first with Salomon Flohr in Moscow 1935, 2nd at Moscow 1936 behind Jose Raul Capablanca, equal first with Capablanca at Nottingham 1936, 3rd at AVRO 1938, and first at Groningen 1946 before playing for the World Championship in 1948. He also won the Tchigorin Memorial tournament of 1947 and came equal first with David Bronstein in the Alekhine Memorial of 1956.

With the death of Alexander Alekhine in 1946, the FIDE saw its chance to take control of the World Championship and invited six players to take part in a tournament to determine the championship. With Reuben Fine declining the invitation to play, Botvinnik won it ahead of Vassily Smyslov, Paul Keres, Samuel Reshevsky, and Dr Max Euwe in the quintuple round robin FIDE World Championship Tournament (1948). He retained the crown in 1951 against David Bronstein when he tied the match, by winning and drawing his last two games. He again retained it in 1954 against Vasily Smyslov by again drawing the match, however Smyslov turned the tables in 1957 by wresting the crown from Botvinnik. At the time, a defeated champion was entitled to a return match the following year and so in 1958, Botvinnik defeated Smyslov in a return match. Likewise, after losing to Mikhail Tal in 1960, Botvinnik defeated him in a return match in 1961. He lost the title for the last time to Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian in 1963. FIDE had eliminated the return match and so Botvinnik chose to retire from world championship play.
Generally regarded as the Patriarch of the Soviet Chess School, his style was based on rigorous opening preparation, deep calculation, and accurate endgame technique. Students of his school include Anatoly Karpov, Garry Kasparov and many more."
(quoted from chessgames.com)