Oregon Class Championships Round 1

mueller
mueller
Nov 13, 2011, 8:44 PM |
2

This last weekend, the 11th and the 12th, the Portland Chess Club hosted the 2011 Oregon Class Championships. To skip me sharing the details, here is the release from NWChess:

           Nov 11-12 Oregon Class Championships (1400+). FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11-12, 2011. SITE: PORTLAND CHESS CLUB. 4R SS in 4 SECTIONS: M/X, A, B and C (MAY BE COMBINED IF INSUFFICIENT ENTRIES). ENTRY FEE: $40. 80% PAID OUT IN PRIZES WITHIN EACH CLASS, NUMBER OF PRIZES DETERMINED BY NUMBER OF ENTRIES (6 OR FEWER 1ST PLACE ONLY, 7-11 1ST AND 2ND, 12 OR MORE 1ST-2ND-3RD). TC: GAME/90, 30 SECOND INCREMENT (IF CLOCK CAN BE SET FOR IT), OTHERWISE GAME IN 110 MINUTES. REGISTRATION: 5:00-6:00 PM FRIDAY OR 9:00-9:30 AM SATURDAY. LATE REGISTRANTS GIVEN ½-POINT BYE IN FIRST ROUND. ROUNDS: FRIDAY 6:30 PM, SATURDAY 10:00, 2:15 & ASAP. ADVANCE ENTRIES TO TD DALE R. WENTZ, 981 SAGRADA CIRCLE NORTH, KEIZER, OR 97303 e-mail DANDTWENTZ@msn.com.

       
          I played in the Newport Open in the Summer (see my earlier blog posts, and the Newport fun-run-chess thang, also see my blog), and I played in the Corvallis versus Eugene match, but I hadn't been to a tournament in Portland for a while, so I wanted to go up and play again.

        Anyway, on Friday, I played my game against Jerry Richards (from somewhere in Washington). I haven't played against him before, so it was good to play a new face. Because of the relatively small number of entrants, the class B and class C groupings were combined (although, they didn't combine the prizes, so the class C players had a chance at winning something too). Checking on the uscf website, his rating is 1350, but he played at much stronger level than that for the first 20 moves, but I guess if you falter in the midgame, its hard for your rating to reflect your strength.

 

 

0-1. It was a good start to have a point, but at the same time, I didn't really feel like I played well, I just tried not to throw the game away until my opponent blundered material to me. I watched the other games playing a little bit, but went to my friend's house for the night. I guess at my level, waiting for my opponent to blunder is usually all it takes to win (which is a little sad, but it also means, if I want to progress, I'll have to take a more active hand in forcing my opponent to err).