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How to create a training plan using your chess goals!
Goals are really important when creating a study plan

How to create a training plan using your chess goals!

tiaandebeer
Jan 12, 2018, 5:35 AM 0

Training plans are one of the most important thing for any chess player. But creating training plans is hard.

Hi, my name is Tiaan, chess player, writer, and teacher, and today I'll be guiding you through the process of making your own training plan.

My OTB rating has been stuck at 1000 for around 2 years. There were several reasons for this, but the most important, and the one this tutorial is about, is that I basically never deliberately practiced, because I didn't have a training plan.

Training plans are very important in any hobby, because they help you guide your practice, instead of just doing random stuff until you get better.

Training plans are going to be different from person to person, but the methods will mostly stay the same. I call the method I use, the "Goal-achiever" (I'm really bad at naming things), because in my opinion it's the method that's best at achieving your goals, as it uses your yearly goals as a template.

Everyone will have their own set of yearly goals, but I'll be using my own for the purpose of this tutorial. So let's start turning our goals into reality, using the template I followed.

 

Firstly, here are my goals for this year.

  • Make it to the South African Closed
  • Achieve a 1600 rating
  • Win against a player with a rating of 1700

Now we need to start breaking these goals down into smaller sub goals.

We'll count achieving a 1600 rating and beat a player with a rating of 1700 as the same goal as they both require me to play better, whereas getting to the closed will encompass playing in different tournaments and doing well in them.

So here are our sub goals.

   Getting to the South African Closed

  • Make it to the National Tournament by doing well in 4 trial tournaments were I will likely play against players that I can easily beat, which means I'll have to work on making less blunders against weaker players.
  • End in the top 10 at the National Tournament's Wildcard to qualify for the Closed.

   Achieving a 1600 rating and win against a player with a rating of 1700 (play better)

  • Improve at the middlegame
  • Learn a few strong openings
  • Learn a few common endgames
  • Improve at tactics and calculation

Now that we have our goals we need to start our training plan.

 

Step 1:

We need to remember to analyze and play regularly, to see where our general mistakes are and not make them again. So let's put that in our plan. 

-Play and analyze a 30/30 game on chess.com once a day.

 

Step 2:

Now we need to break down our first goal in the "make it to the Closed section" which is to make less blunders. So we put that in our plan as well.

-Play and analyze a 30/30 game on chess.com once a day.

-Read articles and watch videos on how to stop making blunders, until we can play 10 games in a row without blundering, at that point we should be able to blunder a lot less.

 

Step 3: 

Now we do the same with our goals in our "play better" section. This can be quite tedious so I'll finish mine and show you my entire training plan. You can just follow the same method that we used in Step 1 and 2.

 

My training plan:

 

-Play and analyze a 30/30 game on chess.com once a day.

-Read articles and watch videos on how to stop making blunders, until we can play 10 games in a row without blundering, at that point we should be able to blunder a lot less.

-Learn middlegame strategy, when to attack, when to defend, how to improve your weak pieces, keeping good pawn structure, how to attack effectively

-Learn the Catalan and Queen's Gambit Accepted openings for white, and the Two Knights Defence and Slav Defence for black

-Learn how to win or draw in all the rook and pawns endgames

-Do 25 advanced tactics once a day, and learn to play blindfold chess to help with visualization

 

This is a very flexible plan, where we can either check the points off one by one at our own pace, or we can schedulize them.

 

As always, my name is Tiaan, writer, chess player, and teacher, and I hope this tutorial helped you!

 

 

 

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