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Simultaneous play

Karl Podzielny played 575 games simultaneously in 1978.  In 30 1/2 hours he  won 533 , drew 27, and lost 15.  Vlastimil Hort played 550 opponents, 201 simultaneously, and lost only 10 games in 1977.  The best record for simultaneous play was achieved by Capablanca who played 103 opponents, drew 1 game and won all the rest in Cleveland in 1922.  George Koltanowski played 56 consecutive (not simultaneous) blindfold games and won 50, drew 6 in San Francisco in 1960.  Janos Flesch played 52 strong players blindfold,  taking 12 hours.   He won 31, drew 18 and lost 3 games. The first satellite simultaneous exhibition was between Kasparov against players in London and New York in 1984.  In 1988 he played 10 opponents in Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, Italy, Japan, Senegal, Switzerland, USA, and USSR, winning 8, drawing 1, and losing 1.   The best simultaneous record is Jude Acers winning all 114 games at a simultaneous exhibition at the 1966 Louisiana State Fair.  The worst performance in a simultaneous exhibition is a New Jersey player who invited 180 opponents to play him in 1977.  Only 20 showed up and 18 won.  Of the two losses, one was to the exhibiter's mother.  In 1910 the Austrian master, Josef Krejcik, gave a simultaneous display at Linz on 25 boards and lost every single game.  In 1966 at the Havana Olympiad, 380 of Cuba's strongest players played 18 opponents each, a total of 6840 individual boards.  In 1984 Kasparov conducted the first satellite simultaneous exhibition, playing chessplayers in London and New York.  In 1988 Kasparov played 10 opponents in Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, Italy, Japan, Senegal, Switzerland, USA, and USSR, winning 8, drawing 1, and losing 1.  In  June, 1997,  1,194 players competed against 40 top players, including Women’s World Champion Susan Polgar, in New York City.  In 2002, Havana had a total of 11,320 chess players in a simultaneous exhibition.  In June, 2005, Pachuca, Mexico  had a total of 12,388 chess competitors in a simultaneous exhibition.  In 2005, Susan Polgar played 326 simultaneous games and 1,131 consecutive games, both a new world record.

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