Hand Carved Ivory Chess Set

EfimLG47
Art0fArcane hat geschrieben:
 

dude, tusks are bone, get a brain before deciding to use one.

@Art0fArcane - you could hardly be more wrong than that! Bones and tusks both consist of organic and anorganic substances. However, the major organic substance of bones is collagen, while the major organic substance tusks are made of is dentin. Two tissues which are not even remotely comparable. Further, the structure of bone and tusk is entirely different and, again, not even remotely comparable. The good thing is that one does not need a medical degree to figure that out. Even Wikipedia helps to get a grasp of the basics! A brain helps, though...

 
EfimLG47

@Art0fArcane - to give a little further explanation:

Inside the cortex, the cortical bone is made up of osteons, a system of lamellae that run along the length of the bone and are arranged concentrically around small channels, forming the so-called Haversian system. Small blood vessels run in these channels and supply the bone tissue. Since these channels are distributed throughout the bone tissue and, depending on their size, also protrude more or less clearly in the processed state, they are an unmistakable distinguishing feature for bone work. They are often visible on the surface as dark spots or elongated dark spots, which can sometimes be traced back to remnants of the blood vessels running in them, which were not reliably removed during the cleaning and preparation of the bone, or to soiling, as remnants of dust and dirt can naturally accumulate in the openings of the channels over time.

In ivory you will not find pores like that. Ivory may develop a little stain due to UV light exposure over time and you may see dark spots where nerves ran through the tooth, but the dentin tissue is significantly different from the collagen tissue of the bone.

The most reliable way to identify ivory is by looking for Schreger lines. These are also caused by little canals in the tissue, but are much smaller. The lines appear, because the light in these areas is reflected in a different way, showing them as some kind of grain in the material. In the absence of Schreger lines, it may still be difficult to distinguish between high quality bone and ivory in a carved an unpolished condition by the mere looks of it. The material you have for bone pieces is just the little material on the outer part of a marrow bone, whereas for ivory you have almost the full diameter of a tusk, which is why you can make massive monobloc chess pieces from ivory, but you will not be able to make them from bone.

To give examples: In the picture below, showing the underside of an ivory chess piece, you can see clearly visible Schreger lines. If you find any of these it is ivory without any doubt. There are ways to further distinguish between fossil ivory and elephant ivory, but this would go too far now.

These, on the other hand, are very clearly visible Haversian pores. If you find something like this on your pieces, it is definitely bone and not ivory.

 
 
 
 
 
madmacsback
Holger, thank you for a thorough explanation. Even a teenager ought to be able to understand this. To paraphrase Aristotle, the first sign of intelligence is knowing what you don’t know. Since Wikipedia was founded, many people now think they are expert at everything. It ain’t so.
theendgame3
Art0fArcane wrote:
crusaderwabbet wrote:
Art0fArcane wrote:
informaticacobach29 wrote:

That's a mexican chess set, made of wood and bone.

Dude, Ivory is Elephant bone, search it up before embarrassing yourself in public.

Dude you have no idea what you are talking about. Ivory comes from tusks and teeth . Search it up before embarrassing yourself. 

According to wikipedia:

"a hard creamy-white substance composing the main part of the tusks of an elephant, walrus, or narwhal, often (especially formerly) used to make ornaments and other articles."

tusks are bone u moron.

It doesn't say anything about it being "bone".

Elephant tusks are teeth, and are made up mostly of dentine, like any animal’s teeth. So they differ from bone the same way any animal’s bones differs from its teeth.

Tusk are "teeth", very different from bone. You indeed are the "moron".

Thanks for the laughs though. cry.png

theendgame3
EfimLG47 wrote:
Art0fArcane hat geschrieben:
 

dude, tusks are bone, get a brain before deciding to use one.

@Art0fArcane - you could hardly be more wrong than that! Bones and tusks both consist of organic and anorganic substances. However, the major organic substance of bones is collagen, while the major organic substance tusks are made of is dentin. Two tissues which are not even remotely comparable. Further, the structure of bone and tusk is entirely different and, again, not even remotely comparable. The good thing is that one does not need a medical degree to figure that out. Even Wikipedia helps to get a grasp of the basics! A brain helps, though...

 

Hilarious. Thanks H.

 

theendgame3
Art0fArcane wrote:

According to wikipedia its bone like tissue

i dont know, the only ivory ive seen is a pendant at my dads house

Mr Smarty pants has been truly embarrassed cry.png

Redgreenorangeyellow
TessaJas wrote:

Hello! I’m new here. My fiancé has a hand carved ivory chess set that was given to him about 20 years ago. I don’t have very many pictures yet. I’m not sure if all the pieces are there. It doesn’t have a board but he is going to make one. Could I get some input on where I could sell it or what it could be worth? Thank you!

 

 

 

 

I hope that chess set it an old one. It would be disgusting if the elephant was killed in recent times for the purpose of making the pieces of a chess set. 

crusaderwabbet

I don't agree with killing any game animal for sport. Modern day poachers kill for harvesting the ivory and let the rest of the carcass rot. Game hunters back in the day utilized the whole animal. Taking the ivory and the African guide harvesting the rest of the animal for the tribe. Game management has improved over the years. 

Redgreenorangeyellow
crusaderwabbet wrote:

I don't agree with killing any game animal for sport. Modern day poachers kill for harvesting the ivory and let the rest of the carcass rot. Game hunters back in the day utilized the whole animal. Taking the ivory and the African guide harvesting the rest of the animal for the tribe. Game management has improved over the years. 

Elephant poaching is plain cruel because they just let the animal bleed to death and take the tusks and and elephants are already severely endangered. However, I think things like deer hunting are fine because there are plenty of deer around and most of the deer is eaten and the fur is used for coats. 

EfimLG47

Elephant poaching is a terrible crime and should be persecuted by all means. The problem is that the organized crime behind the poachers is better funded and equipped than the protection agencies. And in view of the corruption in African states there is little hope that this situation will significantly change in near future.