Annotated Game Collections / Books (comprehensive -ish list)

chessroboto
BonTheCat wrote:
chessroboto wrote:

The 1972 WCC book by Jan Timman is new, .... Prior to this book, Timman co-authoried with Euwe in "Bobby Fischer World Champion!"

Isn't this just a reprint of 'Bobby Fischer World Champion!' with a new foreword by Gary Kasparov, and a few extra bits thrown in?

I was mistaken! Timman's "The Longest Game" was about the battles between Karpov and Kasparov. It was not about the 1972 match between Fischer and Spassky.

With that, the book "Fischer World Champion!" still stands as a body of work on that particular match and is worth going through, especially when the analysis and commentary includes that of WCC Euwe's.

simaginfan
KnuppelBerry wrote:
simaginfan wrote:

One book not on this list is the Sanakoev 'World Champion at the Third Attempt'. Great book.  

I just bought it and am about a quarter of the way through.  It's very enjoyable.  I have a general interest in correspondence chess, as I think it would fit both my personality and schedule, but when I contacted the ICCF, one of the former directors was kind enough to get back to me and make it clear my opponents would be using engines.  I think this would have made Sanakoev sad....

I also hope that Spassky is able to publish a book.  The more I read about him in other texts, the more I like him.

Yep, sadly the game today is about who can use engines the best. Along with many others, I gave up c.c. because of it ( amongst other reasons) Sanakoev would indeed have been sad, but what can you do??

simaginfan
KnuppelBerry wrote:
Loseronthechessboard wrote:

If you had to choose, what would your top 3 (or top 5) be among your annotated game collections?

The ones I have enjoyed the most are: 

1.  500 Master Games of Chess (Tartakower).  Quite possibly because I have had it a while and encountered many wonderful games here for the first time.  The notes are not always detailed, but the game selection is pretty incredible, esp for someone looking for a first collection.

2.  My Best Games, 1 and 2 (Alekhine).  I have the old hardcovers but am thinking of picking up the new version in algebraic notation.  While I read both, I have gotten used to algebraic. 

3.  The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal.  A pleasure to read.

There are others I like a lot, but those are probably the three I have enjoyed most thoroughly.

Everyone I know who has it loves 500 Master Games. A joy of a book.

chessroboto
simaginfan wrote:
KnuppelBerry wrote:
Loseronthechessboard wrote:

If you had to choose,

The ones I have enjoyed the most are: 

1.  500 Master Games of Chess (Tartakower). 

Everyone I know who has it loves 500 Master Games. A joy of a book.

Speaking of Tartakower, I was introduced to his game collection book as one that was kept secret by strong players of the 80s-90s.

 

Fortunately the book has been updated with algebraic notation from the descriptive notation, standard back in 1985.

 

chessroboto

Another game collection book on Fischer:

A Legend on the Road: Bobby Fisher's 1964 Simul Tour by John Donaldson

This is not a tournament book, but a snapshot of his simul tour before the 1972 WCC match. I was reminded of it while reading the tribute on Chessbase.com:

https://en.chessbase.com/post/bobby-fischer-1970-the-forgotten-simul

https://en.chessbase.com/post/bobby-fischer-1970-ii-moody-friendly-generous

chessroboto
ghost_of_pushwood wrote:

Tal is clearly the best there (for me).

Remember this hardcover where the front of the dust jacket was the same as the back?

KnuppelBerry

@chessroboto - Thanks for the info (and the pics).  I never saw that last cover.  

It's nice to see Tartakower has an edition with updated notation.  In fact, I've been thinking about adding a couple of algebraic-notation editions of a few books I already have but am more likely to sign up at chessbase or something like that and get the versions there, since I already have the descriptive notation versions in my office, which I don't mind using with a board (but am not as good at seeing in my head as when reading algebraic).  Have you guys used these?  

 

kamalakanta
simaginfan wrote:
KnuppelBerry wrote:
Loseronthechessboard wrote:

If you had to choose, what would your top 3 (or top 5) be among your annotated game collections?

The ones I have enjoyed the most are: 

1.  500 Master Games of Chess (Tartakower).  Quite possibly because I have had it a while and encountered many wonderful games here for the first time.  The notes are not always detailed, but the game selection is pretty incredible, esp for someone looking for a first collection.

2.  My Best Games, 1 and 2 (Alekhine).  I have the old hardcovers but am thinking of picking up the new version in algebraic notation.  While I read both, I have gotten used to algebraic. 

3.  The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal.  A pleasure to read.

There are others I like a lot, but those are probably the three I have enjoyed most thoroughly.

Everyone I know who has it loves 500 Master Games. A joy of a book.

500 Master Games is one of the best books I have come across. The book is organized by openings and also chronologically, so you can look at how an opening was played in different eras!

The commentaries are elucidating and rich in stories as well. Tartakower, one of the great Teachers!

KnuppelBerry

@kamalakanta - Agreed!  I've recommended it to quite a few people looking for a first game collection.  

chessroboto
KnuppelBerry wrote:

I've been thinking about adding a couple of algebraic-notation editions of a few books I already have but am more likely to sign up at chessbase or something like that and get the versions there, Have you guys used these?  

I have a post that discusses all the electronic versions for reading or going through the electronic books. The biggest limitations are the availability of the titles. Not every title has an interactive version, not every title is in Kindle format, and the rest of the titles are in the PDF format.

https://www.chess.com/forum/view/general/forward-chess-chess-studio-e-chess-books-chess-king-chessable

Kindle and PDF formats will still require you to use an external set such as a full board, a flat magnetic set, or one of the mentioned apps that allows you to read a PDF alongside a 2D chess board on the same tablet.

Welcome to 2019!

KnuppelBerry
chessroboto wrote:

Kindle and PDF formats will still require you to use an external set such as a full board, a flat magnetic set, or one of the mentioned apps that allows you to read a PDF alongside a 2D chess board on the same tablet.

Welcome to 2019!

Thanks!  I'll check out the link.  

Personally, I'd rather have the physical book if I were going to have to play the games out on a board (which is pretty much my set up for all of the collections, currently).  The electronic versions only make sense for me if they are interactive (that is, I can play the games through in the app/book itself while reading the text).  

For titles I either haven't purchased yet or would like to spend a lot more time with and that are available, interactive versions are very tempting....

chessroboto
KnuppelBerry wrote:

For titles I either haven't purchased yet or would like to spend a lot more time with and that are available, interactive versions are very tempting....

Have you purchased any new interactive chess books yet? What's the verdict?

KnuppelBerry
chessroboto wrote:

Have you purchased any new interactive chess books yet? What's the verdict?

Not yet.  I downloaded one of the apps but wasn't able to get my purchase of a book to go through and gave up (only had a few minutes at the time).  Will try again later when I have more time to tinker with it.

chessroboto

Hopefully there are sales for the interactive books in time for National Chess Day 2019.

In case you didn't know, chessable.comhas a few of their top-teir books on sale right now. Includes titles by print publications from New in Chess, Everyman Chess and Quality Chess. Trust me when I say that these titles do NOT go on sale regularly.

https://www.chessable.com/courses/all/all/offer/

 

Lyudmil_Tsvetkov

You have definitely forgotten the finest one, The Fine Art of Chess: https://www.amazon.com/Fine-Art-Chess-Lyudmil-Tsvetkov-ebook/dp/B07SPFTJSZ/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1571012503&refinements=p_27%3ALyudmil+Tsvetkov&s=digital-text&sr=1-1&text=Lyudmil+Tsvetkov

Lo-oool.

Defies all theory.

Defies all patterns.

And is still the most accurate assessment of the game of chess ever.

Whatever, no one will believe me, lol, until I get the GM title.

KnuppelBerry
chessroboto wrote:

Hopefully there are sales for the interactive books in time for National Chess Day 2019.

 

 

Not sure if I missed the sale, but later in the year when I get a little time I'll definitely look into the titles more closely.

ghost_of_pushwood

That Tartakower book was a huge disappointment to me.

ghost_of_pushwood

Or how about the Brian Auger Trinity/Julie Driscoll version? (which I still have on vinyl). happy.png

ghost_of_pushwood

Hey, thanks for being largely irrelevant yet again!

gf3

Alekhine's the only 1 u need 2 know.

yw, dearest ghost_of_pushwood  "there there, it will be ok." is literally the sole sentence needed 4 marriage.  don't fix.  btw jealous genius, it's, "irreverant," 

Scales, brah.  just get a guitar any guitar and play scales; then in here yule create great vibes instead of condescendingly thinking snark's wisdom.