Capablanca game book recommendation?

chess_cat_1000

I admire Capablanca's style of play and tend to play similar openings, and thus get similar positions, that he did. 

So I ask: what is the best instructive Capablanca game book?

Cheers with beers and fears of a Himilayan pants monster eaten your fudge cake to every one that answers.

notmtwain
chess_cat_1000 wrote:

I admire Capablanca's style of play and tend to play similar openings, and thus get similar positions, that he did. 

So I ask: what is the best instructive Capablanca game book?

Cheers with beers and fears of a Himilayan pants monster eaten your fudge cake to every one that answers.

How could you admire his style and know enough to play similar openings and get similar positions if you don't already know his games?

chess_cat_1000

I've seen his games online. I am looking for a game book that I can play out on a board with some analysis of the ideas/ plans each side are thinking of. Can you recommend one?

Rsava

Have you looked at Capablanca x3?

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Capablanca-x3-Career-Fundamentals-Primer/dp/1781943966

chess_cat_1000

 

Looks a bit intimidating. It's 3 books in 1! I am looking for just strictly a game book with some analysis alongside by some kind of Master.

I've found a few on Amazon but don't know which is best.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=capablanca

 

CKLG
Capablanca's Hundred Best Games of Chess is the best collection, and Capablanca's Best Chess Endings: 60 Complete Games focus on the endgames with analysis but still gives the full game to show how to reach that ending.
GWTR

Reinfeld's book on Capa is well-written and fun (much better than the Golombek book IMHO - although I really dig Golombek's book on Lasker!).  Just wish my copy was in AN.

 

Capablanca Move by Move looks interesting.  (I have only skimmed it.)

BonTheCat

Those three books were written by Capablanca. He may not be the best at explaining his own ideas (it was all very effortless for him). If you read only English, the books recommended by CKLG, Golombek's 'Capablanca's Best Games of Chess' and Chernev's 'Capablanca's Best Chess Endings' are good choices. There's also Hooper and Brandreth's 'The Unknown Capablanca', which includes lesser known games by him (208 games, but quite a number of them are off-hand and consultation games and from simultaneous displays - still good for us mere mortals!). However if you can read Spanish there are two more, Panov's 'Capablanca' (70 games) and Ståhlberg's 'Partidas Clasicas de Capablanca' (105 games). In my view, the annotations by Panov and Ståhlberg are more thorough and of higher quality than those of Golombek and Chernev.

A word of caution as regards 'Capablanca Move by Move'. Cyrus Lakwadala is enormously productive and has been criticized for sloppy work.

chess_cat_1000
BonTheCat wrote:

Those three books were written by Capablanca. He may not be the best at explaining his own ideas (it was all very effortless for him). If you read only English, the books recommended by CKLG, Golombek's 'Capablanca's Best Games of Chess' and Chernev's 'Capablanca's Best Chess Endings' are good choices. There's also Hooper and Brandreth's 'The Unknown Capablanca', which includes lesser known games by him (208 games, but quite a number of them are off-hand and consultation games and from simultaneous displays - still good for us mere mortals!). However if you can read Spanish there are two more, Panov's 'Capablanca' (70 games) and Ståhlberg's 'Partidas Clasicas de Capablanca' (105 games). In my view, the annotations by Panov and Ståhlberg are more thorough and of higher quality than those of Golombek and Chernev.

A word of caution as regards 'Capablanca Move by Move'. Cyrus Lakwadala is enormously productive and has been criticized for sloppy work.

Interesting. Having had a look around the Golombek book seems pretty good. Chess Endings is also pretty good, but I'm looking to work on my middlegame. Of course, Capablanca famously played with the endgame in mind (Quote: “In order to improve your game, you must study the endgame before everything else, for whereas the endings can be studied and mastered by themselves, the middle game and the opening must be studied in relation to the endgame.”)

Stiil, it's looking like the Golombek book.

BonTheCat

If you're looking to improve your middlegame, I'd recommend Ludek Pachman's 'Complete Chess Strategy' in three volumes (you can probably find second-hand copies of it). It's not typically full games (although he does sometimes quote the full game without annotations up to the point of the diagram), but based around middle-game positions. In my view, it's one of the best manuals on the middle-game. Pachman is a very good at verbally explaining concepts in a lucid and succinct way without going overboard on variations, and often giving several examples of each concept. Also, it's worth looking for a book Rubinstein's games (Hans Kmoch's 'Rubinstein's Chess Masterpieces' is a good one in English. 100 well-annotated games.) Rubinstein's mostly known for having been a brilliant endgame player, but he played many fabulous middle-games as well. His style was very clearcut and classical, with a very subtle understanding of chess. (I suggest you take a look at the game Rubinstein vs Capablanca from San Sebastian 1911 to get an inkling of what I mean).

chess_cat_1000
BonTheCat wrote:

If you're looking to improve your middlegame, I'd recommend Ludek Pachman's 'Complete Chess Strategy' in three volumes (you can probably find second-hand copies of it). It's not typically full games (although he does sometimes quote the full game without annotations up to the point of the diagram), but based around middle-game positions. In my view, it's one of the best manuals on the middle-game. Pachman is a very good at verbally explaining concepts in a lucid and succinct way without going overboard on variations, and often giving several examples of each concept. Also, it's worth looking for a book Rubinstein's games (Hans Kmoch's 'Rubinstein's Chess Masterpieces' is a good one in English. 100 well-annotated games.) Rubinstein's mostly known for having been a brilliant endgame player, but he played many fabulous middle-games as well. His style was very clearcut and classical, with a very subtle understanding of chess. (I suggest you take a look at the game Rubinstein vs Capablanca from San Sebastian 1911 to get an inkling of what I mean).

 

Thanks for the advice Bon. 

I'm specifically looking for an annotated games collection. I'm thinking Capablanca over Rubinstein because, although both were fabulous players with classical styles, Capablanca, like me, was more of an e4 player whereas Rubinstein was a d4 player. Therefore Capa is my preference.

http://www.chessgames.com/player/akiba_rubinstein.html

http://www.chessgames.com/player/jose_raul_capablanca.html

As for middlegame books, I'm currently reading John Nunn's Understanding Chess Middlegames, which I'm far from completing, though I'm aware of a lot of well-reviewed works. 

mickynj

Personally, I enjoyed Fred Reinfeld's  "The Immortal Games of Capablanca" more then the Golombeck book, but that's just a matter of taste. It does seem a pity that there is no firt rate modern collection in English. Same goes for Pillsbury and Morphy

chess_cat_1000
mickynj wrote:

Personally, I enjoyed Fred Reinfeld's  "The Immortal Games of Capablanca" more then the Golombeck book, but that's just a matter of taste. It does seem a pity that there is no firt rate modern collection in English. Same goes for Pillsbury and Morphy

 

Could I ask why you preferred the Reinfeld book?

More detailed analysis? More instructive? Better selection of games? eg.

mickynj

Hard to say, partly I just like Reinfeld's writing style a bit more. A find his notes easier to understand. But it really is a matter of taste. I'm not sure if either book is available in algebraic notation

kindaspongey

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7128.pdf

chess_cat_1000
mickynj wrote:

Hard to say, partly I just like Reinfeld's writing style a bit more. A find his notes easier to understand. But it really is a matter of taste. I'm not sure if either book is available in algebraic notation

 

Thanks for the advice. From what I've read both books are a bit old-fashioned in their annotations, especially in terms of the opening recommendations, nor really do they look at Capa's mistakes much. Would this be a correct assessment?

There really needs to be a modern algebraic edition of Capa's games.

I'll probably go with the Reinfeld one because it is cheaper.

chess_cat_1000

Thanks all!

kindaspongey

The link is to a sample from Capablanca Move by Move.

chess_cat_1000
kindaspongey wrote:

The link is to a sample from Capablanca Move by Move.

 

I've already ordered the Reinfeld one. Thank you though!