Ebony Pieces Cracking

wiscmike

I had to send all pieces in for replacement but I think they sent me back the queen because they had a problem matching it, If I find it I will take a pic of it.  That was the prestigeous Collector's set.

ROBB_CHESS

Here's a helpful link... 

http://www.ukchessblogger.com/2008/11/why-do-chess-pieces-crack/

I've also suggested the following...

1) Buy Boveda humidity packs and place one in your storage box or use some of this company's products... http://www.bovedainc.com/store/general/

2) When not playing your pieces keep them in a wood storage box rather than on display for long periods of time on their bases.

3) When you first get the set use a very light coat of Renaissance Wax which will keep the pieces natural humidity in. Best stuff on the market available imho...    http://www.restorationproduct.com/renwaxinfo.html

4) Store your collection pieces in an area where the temp remains constant and away from heaters and the like. Ideally around 70F.

5) Or buy my bones and never worry again LOL ! :)

BattleChessGN18

You're commissioning someone to create a chessset out of your bones after you go to the skies? O.o

 

Everything else I've absorbed. ^-^

At this point, though, I've accepted cracks in Ebony. I would simply let it dry and crack, if need be, and then send  them on their way to a woodcrafts repairman to use superglue and fix them.  Or, to avoid having to do this all together, find those pieces of lumber that have been dried out after 3-5 years, so that the cracks are apparent and would indicate where in the lumber to craft.

Bur_Oak

Wood needs to be adequately dried prior to the manufacture of any item, otherwise shrinkage can be a problem. Further, the weight must either be inert, or there must be some allowance for expansion.

The inclusion of a weight in chess pieces can be a problem in two ways: 1. If the weight is inert and tightly fitted, and the wood can shrink, the wood will crack. 2. If the wood is adequately dried (and shrinkage stops), but the weight can oxidize and increase in diameter, the wood will crack.

Properly dried wood and appropriate weights explain how old sets can and do exist without cracks. Modern sets can be a crap-shoot, since not all manufacturers pay enough attention to what is necessary for stable products.

On an aside note, apples or other fruit can provide a source of humidity that is released slowly. They can also introduce mold or other undesirable consequences.

andy277
ROBB_CHESS wrote:

I've known guys at the country club with 100 year old ebony Jaques sets that don't have a single crack in them. I've also seen at the club almost every type of wood that had cracks including boxwood due to improper weighting.

Jaques sets don't allow space for expansion around the weights (which is improper weighting according to your post 56), so how do you reconcile that with your observation of 100-year-old Jaques sets not cracking?

ROBB_CHESS
andy277 wrote:
ROBB_CHESS wrote:

I've known guys at the country club with 100 year old ebony Jaques sets that don't have a single crack in them. I've also seen at the club almost every type of wood that had cracks including boxwood due to improper weighting.

Jaques sets don't allow space for expansion around the weights (which is improper weighting according to your post 56), so how do you reconcile that with your observation of 100-year-old Jaques sets not cracking?

Oh brother... You figure it out hoss... Seems you're always trying to pull other members chains around here. No time for child like games and what I post is to be informative and helpful in a non bias way, nor do I have affiliations one way or another, period. I won't argue with you any further...

Have a nice day ;) 

BattleChessGN18
Bur_Oak wrote:

On an aside note, ...[apples] can also introduce mold or other undesirable consequences.

I was thinking this at the back of my head.

Although, I think to be fair, apples would spoil first before they rot. I guess let it do this first and then toss it before the mold comes in. haha

andy277
ROBB_CHESS wrote: Seems you're always trying to pull other members chains around here. 

Not at all. I'm genuinely curious as to what you consider proper weighting, because as far as I know most old sets were weighted by pouring lead into holes in the bottom or by screwing threaded weights into threaded holes, neither of which method left expansion space. I can't honestly envisage an easy way to weight a piece that leaves space while still providing the degree of weighting that people expect. As has been discussed in this forum before, using a denser (but more expensive) material would leave more wall extant but would still not provide expansion space, unless I guess, it was attached only by the top (maybe a screw top), though there's not much vertical room to play with in a pawn, for example. This also might give rise to other problems, like the weight splitting the fairly small attachment area when pieces are moved vigorously in play.

How did you have it done in your custom sets? And was that your design or the builders?

BattleChessGN18

A new pawn just cracked. This one is a very small crack, but a crack nevertheless. =\

Perhaps I should wait another month or two just to let them all crack out, then I will bring it to my craftsman for repair.