How do I create a balance between chess study and play?

Rubicon0367
I agree that private professional tuition in any field is the best course to successful learning. For the OP who stated they are serious about chess it is an excellent idea.

For someone who has a more casual goal in mind the expense of tutoring (and the difficulty in finding a professional tutor) may out way the end goal especially when YouTube videos are free and a couple of books is still less than 3 or 4 lessons.

For some self tutoring is the only option due to expense or availability.
ghost_of_pushwood

I think you should only use a coach if you show great promise.

chessroboto

When I recommend to work with a coach, I mean to have at least one full session. That gives a student the opportunity to be assessed, to be given feedback on the most efficient way to improve using drills, and to experience how to conduct over-the-board analysis of one’s win and one’s loss.

 

If the student can afford continuous one-on-one lessons/training, good for him/her. If not, then at least the student is on the right track instead of aimlessly reading every ebook and watching every YouTube video. 

Should a player prove to have a talent for the game, and the player (or the guardians) would attempt to go professional, only then would continuous and serious training with a dedicated chess coach (or coaches) be necessary. 

gf3

learning's overrated.

gf3

unlearning is where it's at.

ghost_of_pushwood

apparently undoubling isn't

gf3

indubiously