If there were only 1 chess book you could reccomend what would it be ?


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #161

    Greenmtnboy

    orangeishblue wrote:
    Oraoradeki wrote:

    My personal favourite is "Best Lessons of a Chess Coach" by Sunil Weeramantry (I think that he's one of Nakamura's trainers).

    Or maybe his father

    Sunil is a true genius and it was fortuitous that he married Nakamura's mom and then nurtured his talent through the GM category.    I took a few lessons from him back in the 70s and he was everything you needed in a teacher; creative, enthusiastic and brilliant.  It's just that the expense of quality teachers is not something everyone can afford.  

    The best teachers I have had over the years have been truly open minded and brilliant pointing toward classical sources for the subject matter.  The worst have been peddlers of stereotypes and simple ideas.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #162

    Immoney5252

    Thank you for all responses...I'm certain its beneficial to all rating levels...

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #163

    Immoney5252

    Nice to know hard work pays off!!!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #164

    Bruch

    Greenmtnboy wrote:
    orangeishblue wrote:
    Oraoradeki wrote:

    My personal favourite is "Best Lessons of a Chess Coach" by Sunil Weeramantry (I think that he's one of Nakamura's trainers).

    Or maybe his father

    Sunil is a true genius and it was fortuitous that he married Nakamura's mom and then nurtured his talent through the GM category.    I took a few lessons from him back in the 70s and he was everything you needed in a teacher; creative, enthusiastic and brilliant.  It's just that the expense of quality teachers is not something everyone can afford.  

    The best teachers I have had over the years have been truly open minded and brilliant pointing toward classical sources for the subject matter.  The worst have been peddlers of stereotypes and simple ideas.


    I'm looking forward to reading this book!  It will be in my hands in about 1 week.  What can I expect to learn?

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #165

    nyLsel

    "Chess training for Budding Champions" by Jesper Hall. A complete guide on practical training to become a master.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #166

    nyLsel

    I strongly recommend this book as this has almost all of what you should have learn. The book encompasses the:

    Pawn-Structure, Mental Training, how to use the computer, how to analyze the games, how to play positional and basic positions and guidelines.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #167

    jesterville

    That sounds like a great book nyLsel, I will certainly check it out.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #168

    Oraoradeki

    Bruch wrote:
    Greenmtnboy wrote:
    orangeishblue wrote:
    Oraoradeki wrote:

    My personal favourite is "Best Lessons of a Chess Coach" by Sunil Weeramantry (I think that he's one of Nakamura's trainers).

    Or maybe his father

    Sunil is a true genius and it was fortuitous that he married Nakamura's mom and then nurtured his talent through the GM category.    I took a few lessons from him back in the 70s and he was everything you needed in a teacher; creative, enthusiastic and brilliant.  It's just that the expense of quality teachers is not something everyone can afford.  

    The best teachers I have had over the years have been truly open minded and brilliant pointing toward classical sources for the subject matter.  The worst have been peddlers of stereotypes and simple ideas.


    I'm looking forward to reading this book!  It will be in my hands in about 1 week.  What can I expect to learn?

    you can expect to learn about outposts, weak color complex, developing pieces, clearance sacrifices, taking advantage of lead in development, How to use 3 minor pieces to fight a queen, pawn chains, attack/defensive tactics, and a legit way to draw.

    Sunil is an 1. e4 player (from what I see from his book), and he likes King's bishop fianchetto (or the "Indian style") when hes playing black.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #169

    Immoney5252

    Thanks^

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #170

    PAMetalBoss

    The Complete Chess Course by Fred Reinfeld

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #171

    mldavis617

    PAMetalBoss wrote:

    The Complete Chess Course by Fred Reinfeld

    That's an old book, but I cut my teeth on it decades ago.  I'm going back through it right now, trying to get back into the swing.  His game examples lack the source, and some are perhaps "created" for the purposes of illustration, but as a one book solution, I think it's a worthy candidate.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #172

    Immoney5252

    Have been making steady improvements in my chess...thanks to all!!!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #173

    haystraylor

    Bobby Fischer's 60 memorable games.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #174

    orangeishblue

    500 Games  of Chess Tartakower and Dumant

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #175

    Immoney5252

    thank you

  • 3 hours ago · Quote · #176

    Immoney5252

    Hello again,

    Its been a couple years now since this post and I have steadily progressed in chess. I have found that  " The Life and games of Mikhail Tal" assisted me in this adventure.  I appreciate everyones input.

  • 59 minutes ago · Quote · #177

    Bawker

    There's no way I could only recommend just one... so I'll list 5:

     

    The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal - Just completely enjoyable! happy.png

    The Soviet Chess Primer - WAY better than the "Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess" dreck

    Zurich 1953 - Incredible collection of incredible games by incredible players!

    Secrets of Pawn Endings (Muller) - Dense and "dry", but completely fascinating

    My System & Chess Praxis - A bit dated, but essential reading for any serious player

     

    Those would be my "Desert Island" choices... but I'd be tempted to sneak Kasparov's 5 Vol. "Predecessors" set into the bag too! happy.png


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