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Unpublished Photos of the 1964 Fischer Simul Tour at Kodak in Rochester, NY

  • #1

    Hey all,

    I was thinking about something very cool.  About 15 years ago,  we acquired some photos of the Fischer Simul Tour in 1964.  Turns out one of his buddies who worked at the Kodak Archives was tasked with cleaning out some cabinets and throwing out all the pics in them.  

    The folder contained 17 unpublished photos of the Simul that Fischer had at Kodak taken by professional Kodak photographers.  Kodak took the pics and tossed them in a folder never to be seem again.  That is until Kodak dumped them in the trash luckily someone saved them.

    I was thinking of taking these pics and printing them out on canvasses in a limited print run of 100 prints per picture.  These would be VERY cool for people to have.  What do you guys think about this?  We were thinking of printing them on 18" X 24" Canvas and numbering them.  Here is one of the pictures I printed on a small canvass.  Do you think they would sell?null

    I would love your opinions on what you think of the idea.  Looking to print them out on 18" X 24" canvasses limited print runs of 100/picture

     

    thanks

    Shelby Lohrman

    American Chess Equipment

  • #2
    That is very cool - love the intensity of his posture and gaze.
  • #3

    A piece of chess history. I think you have a great idea!

  • #4
    I would personally crop to the top of the kibitzer's head, just to fill the frame and make it even more punchy, but it looks good as is too.

    If they're all mostly good shots I don't see why they wouldn't sell - Fischer was/is a talisman for many, and very inspirational (discounting his unpalatable later persona).
  • #5

    The problem with cropping it is I only have the photos,  not the negatives.  It gets WAY too grainy if I focus just on him.

    You should see the pic of him at the demo board!

     

    Thanks

    Shelby Lohrman

    American Chess Equipment

  • #6

    Make sure you professionally digitize them.

  • #7
    Drawgood wrote:

    Make sure you professionally digitize them. =

    +1

  • #8

    THey are very cool. What is the ballpark price you would need to make a bit of profit on them?  Do not include shipping as it is what it is. No such thing as free shipping. Ship it best way which might be USPS PRIORITY or FedEx Ground and charge exact amount. 

  • #9

    I am doing a pre-production run next week,  so I will post some pictures so you can check them out.

     

    thanks

    Shelby Lohrman

    American Chess Equipment

  • #10

    Brilliant yes. But I can't forget NOR forgive the diatribe of his final years. sad.png

  • #11

    For those of us not in a reclined position.

    null 

     

  • #12
    Ronbo710 wrote:

    Brilliant yes. But I can't forget NOR forgive the diatribe of his final years.

    There is a fine line between genius and madness, and the older Fischer got the more he stepped over that line. Fischer is prime example of what happens when you take a brilliant mind and focus all those energies on the narrowest of pursuits, at the exclusion of everything else. Fischer was a classic narcissist who lacked empathy and cared little for the thoughts and feelings of others. The only thing that mattered was how things affected him. He had little patience for those didn't see things his way or agree with viewpoints.

    From a panoramic view, Fischer was a "one trick pony," devoid of social skills (bowling doesn't count); he achieved little, if anything, outside the world of chess. No longer the world chess champion, no longer even an active chess professional, the world did not suffer the lose of his contributions during those lost years. His ravings in later life were the only way he could get the attention and recognition he always craved. It was, I think, the desperate act of a man trying to recapture the relevance of his youth. In his later years Fischer became irrelevant and inconsequential -- a pity really.

    In the end, he joins Paul Morphy in the pantheon of chess as another member of the "pride and the sorrowful."

     

  • #13

    Absolutely great idea, there nothing quite like black and white backstage photos that capture so much more than pro pics during the game. 

  • #14
    loubalch wrote:
    Ronbo710 wrote:

    Brilliant yes. But I can't forget NOR forgive the diatribe of his final years.

    There is a fine line between genius and madness, and the older Fischer got the more he stepped over that line. Fischer is prime example of what happens when you take a brilliant mind and focus all those energies on the narrowest of pursuits, at the exclusion of everything else. Fischer was a classic narcissist who lacked empathy and cared little for the thoughts and feelings of others. The only thing that mattered was how things affected him. He had little patience for those didn't see things his way or agree with viewpoints.

    From a panoramic view, Fischer was a "one trick pony," devoid of social skills (bowling doesn't count); he achieved little, if anything, outside the world of chess. No longer the world chess champion, no longer even an active chess professional, the world did not suffer the lose of his contributions during those lost years. His ravings in later life were the only way he could get the attention and recognition he always craved. It was, I think, the desperate act of a man trying to recapture the relevance of his youth. In his later years Fischer became irrelevant and inconsequential -- a pity really.

    In the end, he joins Paul Morphy in the pantheon of chess as another member of the "pride and the sorrowful."

     

    Lou,

    I could not say it better myself.  That was the best description of his problems I have every heard.  Mind if I borrow it?

     

    thanks

    Shelby

  • #15

    Shelby,

    Help yourself.

  • #16

    Working on the prints this week.  I might show one or 2 here. I am not sure of the legal ramifications of putting these photos on canvass though.  Kodak threw them out in the 90's.  They had previously been in their Archives.   The pics were quite literally picked out of the trash.   I am thinking I might have to hand these out as gifts instead of selling them.  What do you guys think?

     

    Shelby Lohrman

    American Chess Equipment

  • #17

    Probably the only way to be sure is to contact Kodak. If they still have the negatives they still own the copyright.

  • #18
    ChessAuthor wrote:

    Probably the only way to be sure is to contact Kodak. If they still have the negatives they still own the copyright.

    The negatives are always kept in the same folder as the archive pics.  At least that is what I was told.  We got the whole folder.  Sort of a conundrum for me on how to go about this.

     

    Shelby  

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