e4 e5 nf3 f6!!??


  • 8 months ago · Quote · #21

    Murgen

    I wish all of my opponents would play Damiano's Defence when I have White! Laughing

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #22

    5-cell

     



  • 6 months ago · Quote · #23

    Charetter115

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #24

    dpnorman

    3. Bc4 is a simple way for white to get +/-.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #25

    5-cell

    Chessking47 ha scritto:
    Fiveofswords wrote:

    the real reason f6 is a bad move is much simpler. It doesnt develop.

    d6 doesn't develop either.

    Ah, but it opens a line for the development of the Black queen's bishop.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #26

    csalami

    Chessking47 írta:
    Fiveofswords wrote:

    the real reason f6 is a bad move is much simpler. It doesnt develop.

    d6 doesn't develop either.

    It doesn't develop, but it prepares the development of the light squared bishop, so it's not a bad move, but of course not as good as the developing move 2. Nc6 or 2. Nf6.

    The problem with 2..f6 is that it doesn't do anything. It is supposed to defend the e5 pawn, but the pawn can just be taken. The only thing it does is weaken your king's position. You could even play 2.. a6 and the pawn is still defended indirectly (3.. Qe7 if 3. Nxe5) and that at least wouldn't weaken the king's position. 2. f6 is just a bad move.

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #27

    Calculator2

    Not only f6 doesn't develop, it weakens blacks kingside, specially the light squares, and it also takes away the natural f6 square for the knight
  • 5 months ago · Quote · #28

    kellypk417

    It is a horrible defence!! Once someone played it and didn't get smoked by me. If played accurately it can not be a total disaster. But... Most don't and get killed. It was a opening trap I thought I had discovered until recently realising it is actually a named black defence. Anyone that has a clue has to know it is weak!!

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #29

    BettorOffSingle

    Sam Sloan likes to offer to play the Damiano (he's beaten experts with it in tournaments), but what he doesn't tell you is that he'll play 3...Qe7 for a -0.60 that he knows inside out.

    Try playing a computer up even a piece and you'll see how difficult it is to win those "easily won positions."

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #30

    mutualblundersociety

    BettorOffSingle wrote:

    he'll play 3...Qe7 for a -0.60 that he knows inside out.

    I think you mean +0.6

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #31

    SilentKnighte5

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #33

    Charetter115

    3...Ne7 is probably the best line for black

  • 5 months ago · Quote · #34

    BettorOffSingle

    pfren wrote:
    BettorOffSingle wrote:

    Sam Sloan likes to offer to play the Damiano (he's beaten experts with it in tournaments), but what he doesn't tell you is that he'll play 3...Qe7 for a -0.60 that he knows inside out.

    Try playing a computer up even a piece and you'll see how difficult it is to win those "easily won positions."

    Your +0.60 is actually much closer to +1.60, and it's also well known that when one played against Kasparov, the pieces were moving differently. Definitely not when playing against Sloan, though...

    The bust is also well-known: 3...Qe7 4.Nf3 d5 5.d3 dxe4 6.dxe4 Qxe4+ 7.Be2 Bf5 8.0-0 (Fisher played 8.Nd4 in the simul and only drew... but 8.Nc3 Qxc2 9.Qxc2 Bxc2 10.Nd4 Bg6 11.Bf4 is also terminal- Black is highly unlikely to survive in that position). 8...Qxc2 9.Qe1, and Black has no good moves left.

    I wouldn't call the bust "well-known." 

    Sloan is willing to risk taking a bullet a few times and knowing he'll win most of the time otherwise.

    Most who could bust this probably can beat him anyway.

    I can show you lines which are -2.00 or worse and where I know the refutation well, but can still get tripped up on some "novelty" that requires another layer of refutation. 

    In theory, everyone plays perfect. 


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