English opening doubts

EqualMustang
What is the best reply for white after black's first move in this line of the english opening? I am trying to learn the English opening, and I played against this position recently and I didn't know how I should've proceed.

GMPatzer

If you want to play the English Nc3 and g3 - Bg2  are keeping in within mean line ideas. I play guy at my club uses this with the idea of e3 Nge2 and 00 when both pawn advances become possible

 

 

my137thaccount
EqualMustang wrote:
What is the best reply for white after black's first move in this line of the english opening? I am trying to learn the English opening, and I played against this position recently and I didn't know how I should've proceed.

 

If you're playing the English Opening, then you shouldn't be confused about how to deal with this. Don't take me wrong - it's not an insult, but before you start playing the English Opening you should have an understanding of the Queen's Gambit, because the point of the English Opening is to increase your flexibility against certain lines of the Queen's Gambit. If you knew about the Queen's Gambit then you wouldn't be confused about 1...c6. Now for the actual answer:

 

The purpose of 1...c6 is to try to transpose to the Slav Defense against the Queen's Gambit. (See what I was saying?) White has several options to avoid the direct transposition - 2.e4 instead transposes to either the Panov or the Pseudo-Panov of thr Caro-Cann. However, the more distinctively English option is to go for a setup with Nf3, e3, Nc3, b3 and Bb2. For example 1.c4 c6 2.Nf3 d5 3.e3 Nf6 4.b3. There is also a third option, which is to go for a Catalan style setup for example with 2.g3. However, before going for any of these, temporarily quit 1.c4 and practice the Queen's Gambit until you understand all the different variations, as they can be played against the English as well.

EqualMustang

Thanks for the comments guys. I started to play chess recently and I was playing exclusively 1.e4 as white and 1.e5 as black and now I just started to reading a book about the English opening and when I play against the main line of English I do not feel afraid or confused, but when I do play a person who likes to play uncommon setups against the 1.c4 it is a kind of a shocking lol 

DeirdreSkye

The set up with b3-e3 is very popular lately in top level.

 

 

DeirdreSkye

I want to add that this is pretty much a universal set-up that can be played against all Black defenses that attempt to transpose to Queen's gambit and not only.

EqualMustang

Thanks DeirdreSkye for your help😃 

questionable_moves

DeirdreSkye wrote:

I want to add that this is pretty much a universal set-up that can be played against all Black defenses that attempt to transpose to Queen's gambit and not only.

Would you recommend placing the light squared bishop on e2 rather than g2 (double fianchetto)? How would d5, Nxd5 be refuted in the example game you posted?

questionable_moves

questionable_moves wrote:

DeirdreSkye wrote:

I want to add that this is pretty much a universal set-up that can be played against all Black defenses that attempt to transpose to Queen's gambit and not only.

Would you recommend placing the light squared bishop on e2 rather than g2 (double fianchetto)? How would d5, Nxd5 be refuted in the example game you posted?

cxd5, Nxd5 I meant :)

my137thaccount
questionable_moves wrote:

 

questionable_moves wrote:

 

 

DeirdreSkye wrote:

 

I want to add that this is pretty much a universal set-up that can be played against all Black defenses that attempt to transpose to Queen's gambit and not only.

 

Would you recommend placing the light squared bishop on e2 rather than g2 (double fianchetto)? How would d5, Nxd5 be refuted in the example game you posted?

 

 

cxd5, Nxd5 I meant :)

 

On move 4 you mean? I'm not sure why black would respond to cxd5 with Nxd5.

 

questionable_moves

I mean on move 21 (21. cxd5) Black replied 21. ... Rce8, I was wondering what the exact refutation of 21. ... Nxd5 would be

DeirdreSkye
questionable_moves wrote:

 

DeirdreSkye wrote:

 

I want to add that this is pretty much a universal set-up that can be played against all Black defenses that attempt to transpose to Queen's gambit and not only.

 

Would you recommend placing the light squared bishop on e2 rather than g2 (double fianchetto)? How would d5, Nxd5 be refuted in the example game you posted?

 

I think the system with the bishop on e2 is easier to play and seems to me more natural.The double fiancheto is not uncommon in English but usually white starts with an early g3-Bg2 and a later b3.The early b3 usually intents e3 and Be2.

As for the game Kovalenko-Solozenkin after 21...Nxd5 22.Qg3 it's dificult for Black to find a defense.

 

 

SeniorPatzer

1...   c6 is like a universal defense to any White opening.  

DeirdreSkye

1...c6 ,1...d6 , 1...e6 and 1...g6 are all reasonable universal defenses.

1...b6 too according to GM Smirnov.

ponz111

Often Black will play 1. … e5 against the English. English is a very good opening and has had

good stats over the years.

ponz111

There is no single best move against the English as several replies and several systems have been played against the English---all reasonable moves/lines. 

my137thaccount
SeniorPatzer wrote:

1...   c6 is like a universal defense to any White opening.  

1.d4 c6 is unnecessary though - why not just play 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 ? After 1.d4 c6 you have to play the Slav against all the sidelines like the London and Jobava-Prie. It is probably OK though.

 

EqualMustang

There was two games in each that I intended to play the English opening but my opponent transpose to some  variation of the indian's defense. 

So the question I do have it is: 

1° How many openings should I learn to play or a least to have the necessary knowledge to have a good game? 

2° Repertoire is it really necessarily thing to know? Or just have the basics theories about one or three openings as black and white would be enough to know by now?

 

sorry for all the questions! 

 

DeirdreSkye
EqualMustang wrote:

There was two games in each that I intended to play the English opening but my opponent transpose to some  variation of the indian's defense. 

So the question I do have it is: 

1° How many openings should I learn to play or a least to have the necessary knowledge to have a good game? 

2° Repertoire is it really necessarily thing to know? Or just have the basics theories about one or three openings as black and white would be enough to know by now?

 

sorry for all the questions! 

 

   If you know where your pieces belong and the typical plans in the basic Black set ups you will be able to more or less deal with everything.