Is this gambit playable?

MatthewFreitag

A possible continuation:

MatthewFreitag

I faced this in a game recently and I was wondering.

Yigor

It's an Anglo-Scandinavian version of the well-known Blackburne-Kloosterboer gambit (1. e4 d5 2. exd5 c6). It's perfectly playable at the intermediate level. peshka.png

Caesar49bc

I don't see black getting any advantage for the lost pawn after 5. d3. Playable, but no real advantage.

PSV-1988

I doubt it's playable, since White didn't end up with any sort of weakness by accepting the pawn, except maybe the c-file if you use a bit of imagination. All Black has in terms of compensation is one developed piece. I don't like 4 e4, because it needlessly creates a big hole on d4. I'd rather go for Nf3, Nc3, d3, g3, Bg2, 0-0 (not necessarily in that precise order).

pfren

No.

ChessieSystem101
pfren wrote:

No.

I like your answer

Yigor
pfren wrote:

No.

 

Blackburne would disagree with U! peshka.png

pfren
Yigor έγραψε:

 

Blackburne would disagree with U!

 

No intention to ask him yet, whatsoever.

MatthewFreitag

The reason I thought it might be playable is because d4 is very difficult of a move for white to make, due to the loss of the c pawn, and both the knight on c6 and the queen eyeing the square. 

d4 is an important freeing move.

Calsuk
Depends on who you’re playing ;)
IMBacon

"Is this gambit playable?"

For the average everyday player?  Yes.

For the elite players? No.

kindaspongey

"I think all openings are 100% sound - all normal openings, that is!" - Kasparov (1991)

piscatorox

Against gambits not going too fast beyond the third rank is often a useful guide. If White fianchettoes the kingside bishop, plays d3, and keeps solid its hard to see that Black has any real compensation for the pawn.