Nimzo Experts: 4.Qc2 vs. 4.e3?

Botvinnik-OCZ

I got horrible result when black double my pawns (4.e3 and Nf3 later). 4.Qc2 can lead to slow development and I don't like it.  Until I found 4.e3 with 5.Nge2 line. If black play 6...Bxc3 after 6.a3 then I get two bishops without compromising pawn structure plus and the queen is still on original square (sometimes she need to defend d4). If black retreat bishop I usually gain time and space advantage.

BonTheCat
my137thaccount wrote:
BonTheCat wrote:
the_boa_constrictor wrote:

great insights, thanks mate. This "Late Benoni" idea is a little devious and didn't give it much thought. For myself I'm not too concerned as I don't often play the Exchange Variation and learning QID + Boggo + Late Benoni is still less theory and time consuming than learning 4. e3 in the Nimzo alone!

 

Correct me if I'm wrong but another benefit with 3. Nf3 is that it's harder for black to initiate a Ragozin? (another defense I dislike facing as white)

Didn't realise there'd be so many intricacies when deciding 3. Nf3 or 3. Nc3

The late Benoni can also turn into the Blumenfeld Gambit, unless you' prefer to play English Opening style and avoid the d4-d5 advance.

I used to play this Anti-Benoni, but gave it up after I realised that there are no benefits of playing it over just starting with 1.Nf3 and playing the mainline Symmetrical English

My thoughts, exactly. However, a fair few players probably do it to avoid the Benoni, the Benko or the Blumenfeld (but probably quite happy to play against most other 1.d4 openings).

 

BonTheCat
Botvinnik-OCZ wrote:

I got horrible result when black double my pawns (4.e3 and Nf3 later). 4.Qc2 can lead to slow development and I don't like it.  Until I found 4.e3 with 5.Nge2 line. If black play 6...Bxc3 after 6.a3 then I get two bishops without compromising pawn structure plus and the queen is still on original square (sometimes she need to defend d4). If black retreat bishop I usually gain time and space advantage.

When I used to play the Nimzo-Indian, I didn't like White's 5.Nge2 until I stumbled on an old game by Spassky against Wexler where Boris played a set-up with 5...c5 and 6.b6 (and responded to a3 by playing Ba5), and sacrificed his queen for three light pieces. This is the set-up recommended by Eddie Dearing in his Play the Nimzo-Indian repertoire book, although he recommends playing 5...b6 first and then 6...c5 or 6...d5 (to give Black more variety).

 

nyan_cat_2700

 

 

nyan

TwoMove

The line in the Eddie Dearing book with b6, c5 and Ba5 is  extraordinary complicated and difficult to play for black. There was a fairly recent game of Caruana's were lost to a player 100points or more lower than him, because wasn't able to cope with difficulties of black position.

Edit once again my memory playing tricks with me and the player playing white a lot stronger than remember, but think comment about complexity of line fair. Not one I would personally go for as black.

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1814637

BonTheCat

TwoMove: I had perfectly decent results with it, but I totally agree. It's complex, and therefore may not be to everyone's liking. I struggled badly at first (one of my first games in the line was a horrible loss in the 4NCL), but it fitted in quite well with the rest of my Nimzo-Indian repertoire, and gradually my results improved.

 

DanlsTheMan

I've played a few Nimzo-Indian games in the last year as black and white.

4.Qc2 (E32-E39 Classical) is uncomfortable for me as white with a knight in my face on e4.

4.e3 is what I prefer with intentions for E59 mainline.