Nimzo-indian defence

fgermuth

Hey happy.png

I am looking for a elite player, who plays the nimzo-indian defence.

Yasser suggested to take one player for a specific opening and see what he does, for example, Sivdler/MVL for the Gruenfeld, but i dont know any player who plays the nimzo-indian defence regularly...

PawnstormPossie

Every World Champion for the last several decades has played it. I assume most top level GMs play it also.

How regularly? idk

fgermuth

i found no games from bobby fischer and only one for kasparov.... (@chess.com)

 

fgermuth

or is the "master game search" just bad?^^ 

fgermuth

ok ok, if i search for nimzo-indian defence there are no or only one game, but if i search for a specific variation there are tons of games

Laskersnephew

 Adams, Anand, Aronian, Carlsen,  Caruana, Ding Liren, Karjakin, and Kramnik have all played the Nimxo as black many times. I quit looking less than halfway through the alphabet

ThrillerFan

Korchnoi played it a ton in the second half of his career (his early days he played the Grunfeld).

OldPatzerMike
fgermuth wrote:

i found no games from bobby fischer and only one for kasparov.... (@chess.com)

 

Fischer played the Nimzo 23 times according to chessgames.com.

PawnstormPossie
fgermuth wrote:

ok ok, if i search for nimzo-indian defence there are no or only one game, but if i search for a specific variation there are tons of games

You can get lost and distracted by the amount of games/players.

I'd focus on more recent players/games...last 5 years or so.

And try to look at not just what they do, but when and under what conditions.

Example, there a some positions that make retreating Black's bishop is better than taking the knight on f3. Where does it go? Why there and not another square?

Laskersnephew

"I'd focus on more recent players/games...last 5 years or so."

I'm not sure I agree. I think there's a lot to be gained by looking at older games when the top players were figuring out the theory. You get a good look at the different approaches the top players tried. For example, the best players in the world gave the Rubinstein variation (4.e3) a great workout in the 1953 Zurich tournament. 

PawnstormPossie
Laskersnephew wrote:

"I'd focus on more recent players/games...last 5 years or so."

I'm not sure I agree. I think there's a lot to be gained by looking at older games when the top players were figuring out the theory. You get a good look at the different approaches the top players tried. For example, the best players in the world gave the Rubinstein variation (4.e3) a great workout in the 1953 Zurich tournament. 

You're 100% correct!

I was implying that the older theories might not help much...right away (playing NID) by looking at all of their games.

Another thing you might think about (mentioning Rubinstein) is looking into the players with White in NID (old and new).

 

On another note...

You can reach the following NID position from 1.c4 English (a couple ways),  1.Nf3 Reti, 1.d4 (a few ways), and 1.e4 c6 C-K. Maybe even more, idk

 

DrSpudnik

Panov-Botvinnik or Semi-Tarrasch?

PawnstormPossie

Panov-Botvinnik...not sure about Semi-Tarrasch 

DrSpudnik

They often transpose. This looks like either.

Laskersnephew

These same kind of IQP positions arise out of several openings. That's why they're worth studying