Persian Opening

  • #21

    This is a facinating opening. Totally new and original. There are so many openings and defences with their special names and titles in the ancient books of "Shatrang-Nameh" (Chess Book in Pahlavi or middle Persian language). This book was later named "Shatranj-Nameh".

    The openings and defences such as "Iranian Attack", "Cyrus Opening", "Parthian Defence" etc. are new ones yet to be explored. 

  • #22
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #23
    uhohspaghettio wrote:

    I've said it five months ago and I'll say it again: it's NOT fascinating. There's nothing fascinating or interesting about it. By calling such an opening that, you're proving that you're just bluffing and don't really understand chess at all.  

    "totally new and original", "yet to be explored".... you could say that about 99% of the first six or eight half-moves of the game of chess.

    I'm just tired of seeing every opening being called "fascinating", the "fascinating king's gambit" has merit. The "fascinating smith-morra" not so much. The "fascinating queen's gambit" - yes, but you'll only fully appreciate it if you're 2500+. The "fascinating london system"... yeah right. And this opening that just breaks all the rules of openings and handicaps both players without any play on either side is a joke and is NOT FASCINATING, it's ridiculous. I guess simple things are fascinating to simple minds.   

    Chess is infinite. If this is true then Chess could not be limited to mainstream openings and defences.

  • #24
    BahramKian wrote:
    uhohspaghettio wrote:

    I've said it five months ago and I'll say it again: it's NOT fascinating. There's nothing fascinating or interesting about it. By calling such an opening that, you're proving that you're just bluffing and don't really understand chess at all.  

    "totally new and original", "yet to be explored".... you could say that about 99% of the first six or eight half-moves of the game of chess.

    I'm just tired of seeing every opening being called "fascinating", the "fascinating king's gambit" has merit. The "fascinating smith-morra" not so much. The "fascinating queen's gambit" - yes, but you'll only fully appreciate it if you're 2500+. The "fascinating london system"... yeah right. And this opening that just breaks all the rules of openings and handicaps both players without any play on either side is a joke and is NOT FASCINATING, it's ridiculous. I guess simple things are fascinating to simple minds.   

    Chess is infinite. If this is true then Chess could not be limited to mainstream openings and defences.

    Yeah, but this opening can't actually be used.

  • #25

    This is also an opening:

    So is this:

     

     





  • #26

    Those are lines that have been explored,so they are openings.

  • #27
    uhohspaghettio wrote:
    BahramKian wrote:

    This is a facinating opening. Totally new and original. There are so many openings and defences with their special names and titles in the ancient books of "Shatrang-Nameh" (Chess Book in Pahlavi or middle Persian language). This book was later named "Shatranj-Nameh".

    The openings and defences such as "Iranian Attack", "Cyrus Opening", "Parthian Defence" etc. are new ones yet to be explored. 

    I've said it five months ago and I'll say it again: it's NOT fascinating. There's nothing fascinating or interesting about it.    

    Yes it is fascinating... to see some people are trollish enough to try, let alone defend, that kind of lines.

  • #28

    you know i once new a persian, you know he opened with showing me a book about iran and i was no thanks, but thanks for frightening me.

  • #29

    چه خبره اینجا؟

    Sealed

  • #30

    hooooy ha

  • #31
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #32

    lol Jenium, I laughed so hard Laughing

  • #33

    Don't see what is all this fuss about. I will not claim the opening is good or that it can not be refuted but there is one game in chessbase. Nasri Amin (2316) - Pourramezanali Amirreza (2350) played in 2012 in Hamadan, Iran (A00).

    So, I gather, if it is in Chessbase it can not be just random moves, right?

  • #34
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #35
    RomyGer wrote:

    The first move 1.c3 is called the Saragossa Opening, because it became popular in the Saragossa Chess Club in Spain, around 1919.  This opening was tested in a Fixed OpeningTournament at Mannheim, Germany, in 1922.  One source mentioned Tarrasch, Leonhardt and Mieses as as participants, but I am not sure.   Anyhow this opening is not that popular !

    Thank you so much for explanation.

  • #36
    deathbychessss wrote:

    Don't see what is all this fuss about. I will not claim the opening is good or that it can not be refuted but there is one game in chessbase. Nasri Amin (2316) - Pourramezanali Amirreza (2350) played in 2012 in Hamadan, Iran (A00).

    So, I gather, if it is in Chessbase it can not be just random moves, right?

    Thank you so much for your detailed look into this. Like "RomyGer" quoted

    above who explained 2 years ago, "The first move 1.c3 is called the Saragossa Opening" . 

    In your reference to the game "Nasri Amin (2316) - Pourramezanali Amirreza (2350) played in 2012 in Hamadan, Iran (A00)", 

    http://chess-db.com/public/game.jsp?id=12501972.12511412.1410816.27527

    it's also named as Saragossa, Hempel Opening. 

    Thanks

  • #37
  • #38
or Join

Online Now