Qf3 Vs Qd2 for Najdorf and Classical Old Sicilian Respectively


  • 6 years ago · Quote · #1

    RainbowRising

    In the Najdorf:













    In the Old Classical Sicilian:












    The only difference between blacks set up is that Qc7 in one and Nc6 in the other. In response, white plays Qf3 against Qc7 and Qd2 against Nc6.

    Why? What are the reasons behind the different placement of the queen?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #2

    Crazychessplaya

    White plays Qf3 to discourage ...b5, due to the threat of e5...

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #3

    RainbowRising

    Thats another thing I dont understand - if black wants to play Bd7 Nxd4 and Bc6, why show your cards with Bd7 first, surely play Nxd4 and then Bd7 Bc6 ? Is the issue that white plays Bxf6 and now gxf is forced due to the d pawn?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #4

    Here_Is_Plenty

    RainbowRising wrote:

    Thats another thing I dont understand - if black wants to play Bd7 Nxd4 and Bc6, why show your cards with Bd7 first, surely play Nxd4 and then Bd7 Bc6 ? Is the issue that white plays Bxf6 and now gxf is forced due to the d pawn?


     Frequently in the Richter rauzer (classical sicilian with Bg5) you do chop the knight on d4 to remove some of the tension.  I personally do not favour the line in the diagram as a6 doesnt fit - Qa5 is better than Qc7 usually.  Also you can sometimes recapture with the bishop on f6 and let the d6 pawn drop as a sac for activity.  Not always, mind.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #5

    RainbowRising

    So a6 in the Richter Rauzer is no longer fashionable? I got these positions from the chess.com database, not sure how up to date they are.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #6

    Here_Is_Plenty

    The line I play would have Black castled instead of a6 and he would chop the knight here then play Qa5

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #7

    Here_Is_Plenty

    d4-d5?  Do what now?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #8

    hicetnunc

    You may prefer to play Qd2 against the Najdorf too, but after 5...a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 Be7 8.Qd2, there is 8...h6 when 9.Bxf6 gives the bishop pair without damaging the pawn structure (compare with the Rauzer), while 9.Bh4 runs into ...Nxe4!

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #9

    RainbowRising

    I've switched to the line Karpov used to play 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #10

    RainbowRising

    Which moves Conzipe? 8. Be3 and 9. 0-0  with 10 a4 ? 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #11

    RainbowRising

    I think its the best way to play against the Najdorf. Target the weaknesses black has created with his stupid pawn moves ;)

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #12

    TwoMove

    What Conzipe was describing Karpov was playing in the 80's when he was still a 1.e4 player. Not considered very critical these days, but has worked well enough for me at my club player level.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #13

    RainbowRising

    I've switched to 6. Bg5 now, and am having more success. 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #14

    yassir_chem

    RainbowRising wrote:

    In the Najdorf:lion in mach

     













    In the Old Classical Sicilian:












    The only difference between blacks set up is that Qc7 in one and Nc6 in the other. In response, white plays Qf3 against Qc7 and Qd2 against Nc6.

    Why? What are the reasons behind the different placement of the queen?


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #15

    bigyugi9

    RainbowRising wrote:

    I've switched to 6. Bg5 now, and am having more success. 


     There is a forced draw after be7 h6 g5 line in bg5 najdorf? anyone to avoid this and still have the aggression (and be able to play for a win) of the bg5 najdorf?

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #16

    TwoMove

    That's news to me, the idea of trying to establish strong Ne5 in Nadjorf quite common. Usually involves sacing a pawn, and black certainly can't force a draw. There are quite a few lines where white can force draw if feels like it.


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