Ruy Lopez Exchange 5...Qd6 6.d3 Quesions

TwentyFive25
In the book Winning with Ruy Lopez Exchange by Soltis, the author explained that 6.d3 provide 3 options for White to open the game. If Black solidifies his e5 with 6...f6, there is no future for queenside fianchetto. So, if Black does not play 6...f6, White can skip the suggested move 7.Be3 to establish a queenside fianchetto with 7.b3, which also follows one of the options provided by 6.d3?
TwentyFive25

 

To demonstrate my idea, I played a game against K12MC at 1000 rating in friend mode with the help of "take back" grin.png. In this game, I only pick the move that follow Soltis's plans for 6.d3

a) pawn a & b push

b) f2-f4

c) delayed d pawn advance

 

Since Black does not play 6...f6, I established queenside fianchetto and it was very solid for me.

TwentyFive25

I am also thinking about study Closed variation as Black and Exchange as White. The reason is I think Black is the one to decide Closed variation and White is the one to decide Exchange variation. Other variations require more memorization and theoretical understanding so I will skip for now.

igotvishwanothing

Not necessarily. Black can decide to play 3...Nd4, entering the Bird variation of the Ruy Lopez, so there will be no exchange variation for you to play.

TwentyFive25
igotvishwanothing wrote:

Not necessarily. Black can decide to play 3...Nd4, entering the Bird variation of the Ruy Lopez, so there will be no exchange variation for you to play.


Wow, Carlen got defeated by someone 200 ELO lower than him in Bird variation! I will carefully study this game to beat someone entering Bird variation!

 

JamesColeman

I’m not sure I even understand the initial post. The Exchange Lopez was my main repertoire for white when I was an improving junior. Against 5...Qd6 I always got great results with the simple 6.Na3.

 

I’ve always thought that 5...Qd6 is pretty much the worst way (of the sensible moves) to meet the opening and not something to worry about. 

TwentyFive25
JamesColeman wrote:

I’m not sure I even understand the initial post. The Exchange Lopez was my main repertoire for white when I was an improving junior. Against 5...Qd6 I always got great results with the simple 6.Na3.

 

I’ve always thought that 5...Qd6 is pretty much the worst way (of the sensible moves) to meet the opening and not something to worry about. 

I am reading the book by Soltis and he suggests 6.d4 if Black to play 5...Qd6

pfren
TwentyFive25 έγραψε:
JamesColeman wrote:

I’m not sure I even understand the initial post. The Exchange Lopez was my main repertoire for white when I was an improving junior. Against 5...Qd6 I always got great results with the simple 6.Na3.

 

I’ve always thought that 5...Qd6 is pretty much the worst way (of the sensible moves) to meet the opening and not something to worry about. 

I am reading the book by Soltis and he suggests 6.d4 if Black to play 5...Qd6

6.d4 is fine for Black. Actually many strong players have employed lately 5...Qf6, which aims at achieving the same position after 6.d4, but avoids 6.Na3 (which is probably the only serious try for an advantage after 5...Qd6).

melvinbluestone

    Caruana just played this Qf6 line against Meier a couple of months ago in Grenke. I think his 10...g5 was a new idea: