Semi-Tarrasch

DeirdreSkye
pfren wrote:

So far I have played the Semi-Tarrash "Kramnik Style" only in correspondence games, and solely against strong opponents, where a draw as Black is no problem. I equalized in all games extremely easily.

Here are all the games so far.

Sinisa Loinjak is the pending IECG/LSS correspondence WC, and after the game he told me that it was a very good lesson to him, as he spent a lot of time analysing, and could not find any real adavantage, anywhere.

 

 

I think it is an easy variation to play as Black- his (counter)play is quite simple and straightforward, and tactics are really few (although they did appear in my game against Van Seben).

 This game has funny knight manoeuvres. Black starts with Nd7 and Nf6 and later he returns the knight to b8 to reposition it on c6! 

It is weird that Black can afford to lose so much tempi with his knight and White can do nothing about it.

pfren
DeirdreSkye έγραψε:

 This game has funny knight manoeuvres. Black starts with Nd7 and Nf6 and later he returns the knight to b8 to reposition it on c6! 

It is weird that Black can afford to lose so much tempi with his knight and White can do nothing about it.

Oh yes. White has a STATIC space advantage, but not a real attack anywhere, nor any useful way to break with d4-d5. So, Black can organize pressure against white's Achilles heel (d4) at his leisure. Of course precision is required, but Black is under no urgency to do so.

In regular OTB conditions things are certainly not so easy, but at correspondence level, where there is plenty of time and engines to ensure that nothing is blundered, Black is fully equal, and risking nothing.

FrogCDE

Stunned at all these replies - thank you. (There were none for the first day or two, and I forgot all about the post.)

TwoMove

What didn't know before looking at the book mentioned by IM Pfren was after 1.d4 d5 2c4 e6 3Nc3 Nf6 4pxp Nxd5 5Nf3 c5 6e3 that 6....pxp 7pxp NxN 8pxN Qc7 has become popular with top level players rather than the traditional IQP positions after 6...Nc6.  It's still useful knowing something about the IQP positions because can arise from many different move order and openings. "Play 1.d4 d5 2c4 e6!" only looks at those semi-tarrasch lines useful for tackling the exchange variation. Can use the semi-tarrasch in more universal way if feel like it.

TwoMove

This opening is suddenly very trendy, there is now a two part series by Tibor Karolyi "Play the semi-tarrasch" https://www.chessdirect.co.uk/acatalog/Play-The-Semi-Tarrasch--Part-2-c9304.html.  The first part has a big overlap with Kornev book mentioned earlier with the e4 lines, whilst the second has all the rest, including the more "universal" IQP positions, which can be reached by other openings.  From the example pdf's quite an user friendly book with example games, and quite detailed explanation of ideas.