Sicilian defense: Scheveningen variation with a6

Optimissed

I don't know about this other game where white allegedly blundered into a draw but was it on the next move? If so, what did white play? e5 is an obvious move which allows white to feed another knight in, most probably, but it upsets the dynamic of the game. However, a4 forces a weakening of black's pawns and it is a move which I thought should be played immediately, since it not only forces a weakening but also is a kind of waiting move.

PawnTsunami
Optimissed wrote:

I don't know about this other game where white allegedly blundered into a draw but was it on the next move? If so, what did white play? e5 is an obvious move which allows white to feed another knight in, most probably, but it upsets the dynamic of the game. However, a4 forces a weakening of black's pawns and it is a move which I thought should be played immediately, since it not only forces a weakening but also is a kind of waiting move.

In Golubev-Barskij 2018, White played 23. c4.  There are several ways for White to convert, but that is not one of them since it opens up lines to the White king allowing Black to force simplifications into a roughly equal endgame.

Optimissed

OK I missed that diagram. I looked at attacking with the c pawn but I didn't like it, for probably all the wrong reasons. I want my N on a4 to strongpoint c5 .... it seems to be no use on c4. Also I want to be able to play c3 to allow the rooks onto the a file.

Jellodude

@Fizzyband In the mainline Keres attack black will be able to get the move d5 is a liberating move, and the attack has essentially lost its venom as in the mainline white will actually offer a trade of queens and black will decline as white's king is less safe. In the endgame, black will get an isolated pawn on c6 but he has compensation as white has an isolated pawn on h5 with black's rook staring at the pawn. Black gets excellent activity with the pawns on the kingside messed and open files to attack on the pawns on the queenside. At the end of the day, black has more space and better rooks while white has an excellent bishop, it's an equal position and the reason people play the najdorf is simple. Either greater flexibility to be able to play e5 or if they play e6 after is to simply learn less theory as I will admit the Keres is scary. But a prepared player will always be fine just as in the Yugoslav attack. You will lose a ton of games but then you will be able to hold. I play the Scheveningen occasionally with my main weapon being the dragon, its completely fine. And you may look at my profile and see how low rated I am but I switched to lichess and I'm 1800 classical over there so I am quite experienced playing the Sicilian at any opportunity. Black and white both get structural weaknesses and both get active pieces. Saying black is worse is just wrong, learn some theory in the Keres I recommend this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G9jKtm8Sds and try it for yourself. It gives you more options especially against the classical.