Suggestions Against the English Opening

  • #21

    i play 1.nf6 its very flexible and can transpose easily for example take this game i had recently

  • #22
    jempty_method wrote:

    I predict much chess progress for you when you realize the bishop pair has nothing to do with "emotional attachment"

    thats all i have to do?

  • #23
    Fear_ItseIf wrote:

    as in Fant-Carlsen 2002

    Carlsen was eleven years old, if that means anything to you.

    Anyway, the ...b6 systems against the English are perfectly good, as long as you master the "Art of doing nothing" (this is the way Sergei Shipov describes the Hedgehog in his excellent book). But you DO have to start with 1...c5 or 1...Nf6, and be aware of the numerous transpositions that exist.

  • #24
    pfren wrote:
    Fear_ItseIf wrote:

    as in Fant-Carlsen 2002

    Carlsen was eleven years old, if that means anything to you.

     

    True, but 11 year old carlsen was between FM and iM strength, stronger than everyone commenting on this threa, with the exception maybe of you.

    If its good enough for an FM/IM i dont see why they think its not good enough for them.

  • #25

    By far simplest is c4 e5 I think. I don't like the Bb4 lines as much if white plays Nd5, and what is the point? You can avoid this by playing Bc5 to begin with. This is all perfectly healthy development, but it doesn't mean the game is easy.

    The other way out is playing ''your own defense'' like the KID or the Slav block. It isn't your problem white won't play d4. There are some differences but they can be handled. 

    I think the c4-c5 lines that may lead to Hedgehog type structures are very difficult. They can certainly be played, but you should have some idea of positional play.

  • #26

    The KID against the English is a royal pain in the butt (for Black) if white opts for the Botvinnik setup. Black has absolutely no attack, and quite a few complex positional problems to solve.

    1...e5 is fine, where I always opted for the ...Bb4 systems, which are just fine: very solid, and also offering winning chances to Black.

  • #27
    pfren wrote:

    The KID against the English is a royal pain in the butt (for Black) if white opts for the Botvinnik setup. Black has absoluteloy no attack, and quite a few complex positional problems to solve.

    1...e5 is fine, where I always opted for the ...Bb4 systems, which are just fine: very solid, and also offering winning chances to Black.

    you are the master but wouldnt the kid not turn into the normal botvinnik set up in the english opening, or is the botvinnik set up bad for black in general?

  • #28
    pfren schreef:

    The KID against the English is a royal pain in the butt (for Black) if white opts for the Botvinnik setup. Black has absolutely no attack, and quite a few complex positional problems to solve.

    1...e5 is fine, where I always opted for the ...Bb4 systems, which are just fine: very solid, and also offering winning chances to Black.

    I know the Botwinnik as an interesting option, I don't know it to that extent. Luckily, after 1.c4 e5 there is no problem. The only ''trick'' is 1.Nf3 Nf6 and then 2.c4! I think incorporating e5 is awkward now, for example 2...d6 3.d4 is a real KID. In case you don't want to play that it is annoying.

    On the upside, 1.Nf3 ruins your chances to play a real Botwinnik with Ne2.

    However, it seems a player needs something in his reportoire other than 1.c4 e5. It's probably no issue for black players who play d4-d5 openings often. (1.Nf3 d5 2.d4) It's not so nice if you're tricked into a Queen's gambit while you don't know much about it.

  • #29

    @FearItself: the 1...b6 move order annoyed me for a long time. Anyway, I have the three volume series on the English opening (Grandmaster Repetoire Volumes 3,4,and 5) and it has served me very well. It has analysis all the way up to move 15 on some lines, and move 43 on other lines. It is very well-written and is written for a grandmaster--it could last you a lifetime. Easily. I hightly recommend the book.

    Anyway, the book provided some interesting insights on 1...b6. It recommends 2.e4!! This transposes into the Botvinnik System, except a prefferable version, because the bishop is on b7, and the e4 pawn blocks it in. I've never lost a game with this setup.

  • #30

    To all interested, I made a reverse sicilian themed tournament (1. c4 e5). Seems like this would appeal to a lot of English players. Note: >1700 player rating range. http://www.chess.com/tournament/reverse-sicilian

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