Test my french defense!

Sherlock-Holmes

Agreed... 

Sherlock-Holmes

BTW, which one do you prefer to play? Rubinstein variation? Steinitz? 

chamo2074

burn

ThrillerFan
chamo2074 wrote:

burn

Wow!  About the only one I don't play!

 

Winawer (7...Qc7, 7...O-O, 7...Kf8, and 7...Nf5), Portisch-Hook, McCutchen (Mostly 8...g6, occasionally 8...Kf8), Classical (6...c5 against Alekhine-Chatard), Steinitz (if 4.e5, and what I play as White in Correspondence - Advance over the board), Rubinstein, etc.

 

Only lines against 3.Nc3 I do not play as Black are 5...Ba5 in the Winawer, Burn, and Fort Knox, but obviously I understand them as I face them as White occasionally, though it is rare as correspondence players mostly tend to go for Winawer and Classical lines, not the Fort Knox.

chamo2074

Interesting, I usually follow the Morozevitch line, the reason why I chose this repertoire is because it does not recquire a lot of theory learning:

 

KariEgilsson
chamo2074 wrote:

I would play the closed line, with cxd and f3 later

I'm not an expert on the Tarrasch but I think c5 is considered the most testing move to play against it.

chamo2074
KariEgilsson a écrit :
chamo2074 wrote:

I would play the closed line, with cxd and f3 later

I'm not an expert on the Tarrasch but I think c5 is considered the most testing move to play against it.

Yes but the line I just shown above is just so difficult not to play it's so spicy

KariEgilsson
chamo2074 wrote:
KariEgilsson a écrit :
chamo2074 wrote:

I would play the closed line, with cxd and f3 later

I'm not an expert on the Tarrasch but I think c5 is considered the most testing move to play against it.

Yes but the line I just shown above is just so difficult not to play it's so spicy

That makes a lot of sense, in a lot of ways. it's more important to play openings you feel comfortable with than just what engines or theory dictate.