There must be a refutation... (Paulsen Sicilian, without ...Nf6)

  • #1

    Here is an opening I played (as White) in a recent game.

    Black's 5th move looks laughable, but after thinking for a while, I played the even more laughable 6.Qd3 (I won, but after such a blunderfest from both sides that I would be ashamed to post it), seeing neither how not to lose a pawn otherwise, nor what compensation I could get for it.

    Suggestions... ?

    I can hardly believe this is a refutation of my 5.c4, is that ?

  • #2

    Not really a refutation, but 6.Nc3 Bb4 7.Nb5 looks good for white (7...Qxe4+? 8.Be2).

  • #3

    This trick often wins a pawn on e4 in a variety of openings (Scotch Game, English Defense, etc.), but perhaps here White has compensation after Nxc6 Qxe4+ Be2 Qxc6 O-O?   I dunno, looks sort of sketchy. :)

  • #4

    Or, er, what pfren suggests.

  • #5

    I'm guessing your threw out some lines where you got doubled pawns or maybe even lost a pawn.  Look a little more, with a move like Qh4 you may zoom ahead in development for such a small price.  It would help you posted a sample line that was troubling you.

    Although pfren already gave an answer.

  • #6

    Being a former Taimanov player, Black can get a slight advantage with the line White played.  5.c4 is a mistake.  Black can take advantage of it with 5...Bb4+.

    If White wants to play a Maroczy Bind against the Taimanov, which is perfectly fine, but he gets no advantage, then he should play 5.Nb5 first, virtually forcing 5...d6, and only then, play 6.c4, when 6...Bb4+ is impossible because the d-pawn now blocks in the Dark-Squared Bishop.  Black will often end up playing a Hedgehog structure here.

  • #7
    ThrillerFan wrote:

    Being a former Taimanov player, Black can get a slight advantage with the line White played.  5.c4 is a mistake.  Black can take advantage of it with 5...Bb4+.

    Too bad that Kramnik did not know 5.c4 is a mistake, but eventually managed to win as white against a woodpusher named Kasparov.

  • #8
    pfren wrote:
    ThrillerFan wrote:

    Being a former Taimanov player, Black can get a slight advantage with the line White played.  5.c4 is a mistake.  Black can take advantage of it with 5...Bb4+.

    Too bad that Kramnik did not know 5.c4 is a mistake, but eventually managed to win as white against a woodpusher named Kasparov.

    Neither of them understood chess Laughing

  • #9
    ThrillerFan wrote:

    Being a former Taimanov player, Black can get a slight advantage with the line White played.  5.c4 is a mistake.  Black can take advantage of it with 5...Bb4+.

    Huh ?

    After 6.Bd2 I cannot see any problem for White. Exchanging the bishops or even worse 6...Nxd4 7.Bxb4 gives Black nothing apart weak squares.

    Post edited to see the loss / sacrifice of a pawn in all the lines, none of them looked very promising to me.

    Thanks for the suggestions, pfren and Gargleblaster. I begin to see why Black plays ...a6 in some lines, even if b5 will never be pushed with a pawn on c4.

  • #10
  • #11

    Try this, it's more likely:

    Black seems being in deep trouble at the final position- d5 is very weak, he can't castle in safety, he is seriously behind in development... and so on.

    5.c4 is probably not white's most challenging move, but certainly it's not a "mistake".

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