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what is the best opening?

  • #1

    I need help with openings. I like the kings gambit, the larson, the queens gambit and the Ruy lopez.  do you have any sugestions?


  • #2

    Play through some master games in the openings you like. Get a feel for which one leads to middlegames you like and understand better. Then try them out in blitz games.

     

    There is no best opening. If there was, almost every GM would be playing it!


  • #3
    Caro Kann defence is my favourite at the moment
  • #4

    The most important factor for the amateur is to develop a small number of openings that limit what the opponent can do in reply. This is easier to do with Black. For example, if White plays 1. e4, Black's 1. ...e5 exposes him to a myriad of possibilities. He must be prepared for the King's Gambit, and unless he specializes in the drawish Petroff, for the Lopez, the Piano, etc, etc. This is why players will specialize in the Sicilian, or the French, or the Caro-Kann, since the second player then has the advantage of establishing the character of the game in a system with which he is familiar. There are so many lines of the Sicilian that I prefer the French. Likewise against 1. d4, Black might play the Dutch for instance with 1. ... f5, which is just about impossible for White to turn into anything but the Dutch.

    It is possible then for Black to learn in depth a relatively few number of opening lines. With White things are more difficult, since 1. e4 or d4 requires White to be ready for many defenses. This makes Larson's 1. f4 attractive, if one is prepared to face the From Gambit. I've also tried such off-beat openings as the Saragossa 1. c3, though this is the sort of thing that can go in many directions if Black doesn't rush his pawns to take over the center.  The Reti 1. Nf3 is another possibility. My own solution for White was to stick with 1. e4, since I had previously played Sicilian and French from the Black side, and cultivated the Exchange Variation of the Ruy Lopez to eliminate other possibilities. In this case you have to learn the Petroff as well.

    Opening repertoire is a matter of personal choice and style, but with a little study and ingenuity the serious amateur can at least limit the amount of opening theory to master to a reasonable amount and get on with playing chess. 


  • #5

    This makes Larson's 1. f4 attractive

     

    Actually, I think 1.f4 is Bird's opening and 1.b3 is Larsen's opening. The latter opening (mentioned by the original poster) has a more solid reputation. There's also the Bird-Larsen opening which combines the two approaches.


  • #6
    play an opening that you feel playing for the time being. theres no best opening as likesforests said, its how you survive fitpalls and defend yourself in the middlegame.
  • #7
    likesforests wrote:

    This makes Larson's 1. f4 attractive

     

    Actually, I think 1.f4 is Bird's opening and 1.b3 is Larsen's opening. The latter opening (mentioned by the original poster) has a more solid reputation. There's also the Bird-Larsen opening which combines the two approaches.


    You are right. Larsen used to play Bird's opening a lot and was well known for his approach to it.


  • #8
    Ricardo_Morro wrote: likesforests wrote:

    This makes Larson's 1. f4 attractive

     

    Actually, I think 1.f4 is Bird's opening and 1.b3 is Larsen's opening. The latter opening (mentioned by the original poster) has a more solid reputation. There's also the Bird-Larsen opening which combines the two approaches.


    You are right. Larsen used to play Bird's opening a lot and was well known for his approach to it.


    b3 is the larson.


  • #9
    Ricardo_Morro wrote:

    The most important factor for the amateur is to develop a small number of openings that limit what the opponent can do in reply. This is easier to do with Black. For example, if White plays 1. e4, Black's 1. ...e5 exposes him to a myriad of possibilities. He must be prepared for the King's Gambit, and unless he specializes in the drawish Petroff, for the Lopez, the Piano, etc, etc. This is why players will specialize in the Sicilian, or the French, or the Caro-Kann, since the second player then has the advantage of establishing the character of the game in a system with which he is familiar. There are so many lines of the Sicilian that I prefer the French. Likewise against 1. d4, Black might play the Dutch for instance with 1. ... f5, which is just about impossible for White to turn into anything but the Dutch.

    It is possible then for Black to learn in depth a relatively few number of opening lines. With White things are more difficult, since 1. e4 or d4 requires White to be ready for many defenses. This makes Larson's 1. f4 attractive, if one is prepared to face the From Gambit. I've also tried such off-beat openings as the Saragossa 1. c3, though this is the sort of thing that can go in many directions if Black doesn't rush his pawns to take over the center.  The Reti 1. Nf3 is another possibility. My own solution for White was to stick with 1. e4, since I had previously played Sicilian and French from the Black side, and cultivated the Exchange Variation of the Ruy Lopez to eliminate other possibilities. In this case you have to learn the Petroff as well.

    Opening repertoire is a matter of personal choice and style, but with a little study and ingenuity the serious amateur can at least limit the amount of opening theory to master to a reasonable amount and get on with playing chess. 


    i have a lot of openings i play the larson is my favorete then the smith morra gambit then the kings gambit. and I have many more. of these I mentiond do you play any? If so wich is your favorete?????

    P.S Thanks for the help!


  • #10
    gucci(quiet)piano,queens gambit,four knights,are my favorites. the purpose in learning the openings is to discern which is more comfortable to you. The purpose of any opening is to be able to control the middle,develop your pieces, and get to the middle game somewhat unscathed. An opening wil not win you the game unless you back that with a thorough knowledge of the strategies and tactics of the game. Like football(american football),the winner is the one who makes the fewest mistakes .
  • #11
    doctor-ice wrote: gucci(quiet)piano,queens gambit,four knights,are my favorites. the purpose in learning the openings is to discern which is more comfortable to you. The purpose of any opening is to be able to control the middle,develop your pieces, and get to the middle game somewhat unscathed. An opening wil not win you the game unless you back that with a thorough knowledge of the strategies and tactics of the game. Like football(american football),the winner is the one who makes the fewest mistakes .

    thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1


  • #12
    chesscrazy127, thank you for your chess wisdom on the opening.  It helps me...
  • #13
    Any oppenning can be good.It depends on the one that your most comfortable with,and one that you fully studied and applied it in a game.I find that if you learn two oppennings for each side,that is good for a start.If the oppennings dont seem to work for you,try other ones.I find it takes more studying than one thinks,but when you win  with that particular oppenning,then it will have paid off.
  • #14

    There is a mathematical way to calculate every opening out precisely and decide which one is the best, but the amount of memorisation for that just doesnt make it chess.

     

    1. e4 and 1. d4 are the most popular, but all others are playable.


  • #15
    I like  french defense cause it gives chance to black i think.Also as white im playing queen pawns opening (1.d4).I like scandinavian defense too but it gives not good chance to black...
  • #16
    The French is very good. 
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