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What to play against the pirc ?

  • #1

    I find it extremely hard to come up with a plan against this opening.

    Black has no weaknesses, no points to attack and all the times I tried to launch a pawn storm against the king, they got my king first.

     

  • #2

    I'm no expert but why did you play 9. Bh6?

  • #3
    Ishaq786 escreveu:

    I'm no expert but why did you play 9. Bh6?

    To exchange his powerfull bishop and to make his king weaker.

  • #4

    Instead of 4.Nf3 I go 4.f4 Austrian attack. Then after Bg7 Nf3 0-0 you can go e5 and try to dominate the space or just Be3 straight away (if Ng4 Bg1 save the bishop then kick the knight h3) But black will still get some play if they know how to play Pirc.

  • #5

    Anything you want. It’s redundant 

  • #6

    Because white owns the f e and d files effectively, and blacks cramp is unsolvable

  • #7

    Gutted

  • #8
  • #9
     
    Study the Bg5 lines and go all out aggro. 

     

  • #10
    Lawkeito wrote:
    Ishaq786 escreveu:

    I'm no expert but why did you play 9. Bh6?

    To exchange his powerfull bishop and to make his king weaker.

    e5 looks a better option, open him up and punish him for avoiding his own e5

  • #11

    The problem with your "game plan"

    7.Qd2 - pretty much tells your opponent 1 of 2 things is going to happen.  Youre going to play Bh6, and or castle queenside.  Black gets a head start by playing 7...b5, and the pawn storm begins.

    8.a3 just helps blacks attack.  Instead 8.Bd3 develops, and keep your opponen guessing.

    11.0-0-0 what attack do you think you have?  Black has dark square weaknesses around his king, but you dont have a dark square bishop, you have 2 pieces aiming toward the kingside, while black has a space advantange, and 4 pieces on the queenside.  

    You lack the material, and piece activity to launch any sort of kingside attack.  While blacks attack will be much more effective.

  • #12

    If you want a safer positional plan, look into 7.a4. Classical lines with a4 against ...c6 plans are a reasonable try for advantage. If you want to play more directly to attack the king, I think it would be better to play the 150 Attack and omit h3. I like 4.Be3 with flexibility on committing the knight (sometimes f4 is even possible). Against early castling, White's attack is fastest there. This approach has been recommended by Kaufman, Kornev, and Jansa among many other authors. Shaw also makes an interesting case for 4.Bg5. Sometimes these approaches transpose with a quick Qd2+Bh6.

    Perunovic had an interesting lecture on Chessbrahs about new ideas in the Austrian Attack. This is principled if you like forcing play.

    Whatever you decide, learn one system well. Sharper systems require greater precision and are more difficult to learn. If you want something simple, I'd go with positional systems in the Classical and play a4 against ...c6.

  • #13

    i think i disagree with all those who commented your game, lol.

    U made a very good job till Bh6 and more.

    It is true that a3 weakens your "future" castle, so Bd3 is relatively best.

    The first real innacuracy in my opinion is Nxd4.

    U need your knight : Rxd4 to attack d6 followed by Ng5 with dangerous threats : u could continue then with h4-h5 or f4 with e5 idea.

    Your position was really good up to this point.

    Some other points in my analysis :

    The major problem was not the opening.

    But your way to play : too much hesitant, while u have to play active.

    Some advice Austrian attack : really, very complicated to handle.

    While the stuff i proposed with f3-Be3-Qd2 is very simple.

  • #14

    I was going to say it too, but listen to poucin.  Just by his title alone, he knows more than the rest of us.  I was going to suggest the same move order or, as an alternative, to try and launch a kingside attack at some point with g4.  Solving the potential problem of black's bishop makes sense, but there are better ways to do it than to give up your own strong bishop and remove your queen from the center.  Playing e5 is logical because it makes it harder for black to do anything constructive with the bishop.  If you can eventually play f4 and/or g4 (possibly with the bishop on f4 if you can't get the pawn there) you will be cramping his kingside and will immobilize the bishop.  

  • #15

    Thank you very much for your advice and specially to IM poucin for the detailed analysis; so much insights there.

    That straightforward system seems a good and  simple option to face the pirc. I'll take the suggestion.

  • #16
    Lawkeito wrote:
    Ishaq786 escreveu:

    I'm no expert but why did you play 9. Bh6?

    To exchange his powerfull bishop and to make his king weaker.

    Yes, but you gave up your own bishop and removed your queen from the centre board.

  • #17

    15. Nb1 stops all his funny business, then you can continue your King side attack with pawns queen knight and bishop....knights go back to get effect sometimes.....

  • #18
    universityofpawns wrote:

    15. Nb1 stops all his funny business, then you can continue your King side attack with pawns queen knight and bishop....knights go back to get effect sometimes.....

    Not advisable: If 15.Nb1? Qb6!-+ e.g. 16.Nf3 c5 and White is getting run over in the center while Black's pawn avalanche on the queenside continues.

    White appears to have advantage at this stage, but he needs to play energetically in the center as poucin indicated: 15.e5!+/- dxe5? 16.Nf5!!+- gxf5 17.Bxf5 with ideas of Ne4 and Rxd7, White has a crushing attack. (See Post #13 for more analysis of the game.)

    The system White played is perfectly playable and he had several opportunities in a sharp middlegame. One slack move can make all the difference in sharp positions though. In the opening, 7...b5 was a bit committal and a safer approach for White is 8.Bd3 +/= with the likely knight regrouping of Ne2-g3. White can castle kingside and play in the manner of a Ruy Lopez. Kamsky - Mamedyarov, Sofia 2007 and Nunn - Gelfand, Munich 1991 are good examples of how to play White when Black commits to an early ...b5. (I have Mihail Marin's excellent recent book on the Pirc to thank as a reference here.) It helps to be flexible when handling the Pirc (and this goes for both sides).

  • #19

    150 attack or austrian attack scores well against the pirc

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