why the Giuoco piano isn't played?


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #1

    theidoogy

    I played in my life many chess games, also in this site, and in all my short life (13 years) no one played the giuco piano against me. I think the italian game suppose to be a very good and devloping opening, and in this opening giuco piano is one of the best options for simple or even better position for white. I wonder if someone can tell me, why people never played this opening against me?

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #2

    mvtjc

    We can't know since we are diferent persons, but most probably because it is not as dynamic as the other lines of e4 like the sicilian, ruy lopez, etc.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #3

    theidoogy

    by the way, for who doesn't know the guioco piano is this:



  • 4 years ago · Quote · #4

    GM_fishys

    I'd like to play it, but players seem to like the philidor and scandinivian and other boring stuff

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #5

    DrSpudnik

    The slowness and creepy equality of Giuoco lines led me to the Evans Gambit.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #6

    orchard_littlejoe

    It's not just the opening because that in itself in rather boring. It's the variations that follow that can make it more exciting.  

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #7

    mrtnwldrn

    how often are you playing  1...........e5?

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #8

    fatymid

    Guioco Piano is one of the most drawing openings for white imo

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #9

    DrSpudnik

    Actually, the statistics show the GP with a decent 40+% win ratio, similar to (even a few points higher than) the Lopez. The slower lines (4...Nf6 5. d3) probably play out a lot like the Lopez lines with d3.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #10

    zxb995511

    Weak players tend to play what stronger players (GMs) play. At their level this opening does not squeeze enough advantage for white out of the opening so GMs do not play it. Since they do not play it we do not play it -but it does not mean it is terrible- just not as competetive as other openings.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #11

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    Probably because it's recommended for beginners, meaning that their book knowledge will mitigate any weak moves they would otherwise make.  For example, without books a beginner may play ...Bb6 when Bb4+ is the only move that fights for equality.  Other openings would create more complicated problems for the beginner that they aren't equipped to solve.  It is recommended by some to play classically even as black, but unless the opponent is playing 1.g4 1.b4 1.g3 1.b3 and maybe 1.c4 (all of which mean that playing 1...e5 will ensure an imbalanced game) I don't see why I should just react to white. 

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #12

    Robbie960

    I play it some; some of my best games are started w/ the Giuoco Piano.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #13

    theidoogy

    ScorpionPackAttack wrote:

    Probably because it's recommended for beginners, meaning that their book knowledge will mitigate any weak moves they would otherwise make.  For example, without books a beginner may play ...Bb6 when Bb4+ is the only move that fights for equality.  Other openings would create more complicated problems for the beginner that they aren't equipped to solve.  It is recommended by some to play classically even as black, but unless the opponent is playing 1.g4 1.b4 1.g3 1.b3 and maybe 1.c4 (all of which mean that playing 1...e5 will ensure an imbalanced game) I don't see why I should just react to white. 

    As a beginner i used to play the italian, but other variations like four knights and such. Only when i study openings i decide to understand the idea behind the italian and begind the move of giuoco piano.

    Just for you guys to know, i don't play it either, i play usually queen's gambit and sometimes ruy lopez (as white), i don't play this opening, i just don't like this opening, it's too boring and excpected, but i wondered how any player never (never!!!) played it against me.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #14

    NimzoRoy

    The Guico Piano arises from 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 - 4.c3 isn't mandatory to make the opening a GP. 

    Consider the following stats from ChessBase's 2012 BIG DB (5.5 million games)

    3.Bc4         55,000 games         54% winning percentage (W)

    3.Bb5 a6   167,000 games         56% (W)   

    3.Bb5 ...?  70,000 games         +56% in all lines except 2 (3...f5, 3...g6)

    The Game Explorer (Master Games) shows

    3.Bb5 66,630
    38.1% 36.8% 25.1%
    3.Bc4 13,710
    38.7% 29.8% 31.5%

    The Ruy Lopez is about 3x more popular in the CB BIG DB and 5x more popular in the Game Explorer...

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #15

    xxvalakixx

    There are 2 reasons.The first is that, e4-e5 openings are not played so often.
    Secondly,it is not give any advantage for black. For example.



  • 4 years ago · Quote · #16

    DrSpudnik

    Well, I guess that settles that. 1...e5 is for dimwits and so nobody plays it any more, because the Sicilian kicks ass every time.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #17

    ChessCooler

    not true e5 is great

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #18

    NimzoRoy

    xxvalakixx wrote:

    There are 2 reasons.The first is that, e4-e5 openings are not played so often.

    After 1.e4 the Game Explorer shows e4-e5 openings are in fact played so often

    MoveGames
    White Wins
    Draws
    Black Wins
    1...c5 272,196
    37.5% 30.4% 32.1%
    1...e5 128,964
    38% 35.4% 26.7%
    1...e6 77,554
    40% 32% 27.9%
    1...c6 40,583
    37.8% 35.9% 26.3%
    1...d6 24,034
    41.8% 30.2% 28.1%
    1...g6 20,495
    39.2% 27.7% 33%
    1...Nf6 15,129
    40.4% 30.2% 29.4%
    1...d5 12,990
    42.8% 29.8% 27.4%
  • 4 years ago · Quote · #19

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    theidoogy wrote:
    ScorpionPackAttack wrote:

    Probably because it's recommended for beginners, meaning that their book knowledge will mitigate any weak moves they would otherwise make.  For example, without books a beginner may play ...Bb6 when Bb4+ is the only move that fights for equality.  Other openings would create more complicated problems for the beginner that they aren't equipped to solve.  It is recommended by some to play classically even as black, but unless the opponent is playing 1.g4 1.b4 1.g3 1.b3 and maybe 1.c4 (all of which mean that playing 1...e5 will ensure an imbalanced game) I don't see why I should just react to white. 

    As a beginner i used to play the italian, but other variations like four knights and such. Only when i study openings i decide to understand the idea behind the italian and begind the move of giuoco piano.

    Just for you guys to know, i don't play it either, i play usually queen's gambit and sometimes ruy lopez (as white), i don't play this opening, i just don't like this opening, it's too boring and excpected, but i wondered how any player never (never!!!) played it against me.

    The Giuco Piano isn't inherantly boring, but only seems that way because so many games throughout history started that way and it has been analysed to death.  I was studying a Petrosian game and thought, "Four Knights game?!  Good grief, but I'll stick with this study" Then, things started becoming imbalanced, and even interesting!  For example, Petrosian made an eventual Qh5 move (presumably) meant to prevent black from playing ...h5, which ensured that white would carry on with his pawn storm.  Petrosian was also so obsessed with the e6 square that he forgot an even stronger sac with Nf6, leading to a massive win in material or mate.  On its own the four knights is boring, but that Four Knights' game taught me that the players themselves can make even the dullest openings interesting.  Then again it is the middlegame where the interesting positions are anyway.  

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #20

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    hessmaster wrote:
     

     

    I always hate those lines where white trades the Nc6 then follows up with e5!  Or, plays Qf3, which prevents ...b6 as e5 hits the knight while the queen stares down at the rook.  I mostly like Sicilians with a6,e6, and d6 pawns, usually not moving the b-pawn until some other pieces move first.  Though, I like a bishop on e6 as it watches the usually weak d5 square.  I also usually know when to push for a ...d5 pawn break or even ...e5 if white has an f-pawn out like in the f4 open Sicilians. 


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