Anatoly Karpov and Tigran Petrosian question

Kramposian

Any other players that play like them?

pfren

Obviously not- else they would become world champions, too. Tongue out

StevenBailey13

Capablanca was similar in some ways to Karpov.

Kramposian

Does Vladimir Kramnik play like Anatoly Karpov?

pfren
knowthyself wrote:

Does Vladimir Kramnik play like Anatoly Karpov?

In some ways, yes. One thing for sure is that Karpov was his chess idol when he was young.

Kramposian

What about Aron Nimzowitsch?

trysts

Who plays like Petrosian? I've played through only about a few of his games, yet those few games have really influenced me!Smile

Beachdude67

Very, very few players could play like Petrosian and become a world champion.

SimonWebbsTiger

@knowthyself

Petrosian was vastly influenced by Nimzowitsch. He studied Nimzo's writings as a lad.

Someone influenced by Petrosian, and also a great fan of Nimzo, is retired British GM Ray Keene. Keene has written a recently published book about Petrosian and his book on Nimzowitsch is a classic.

Beachdude67

Believe it or not I really think that Kasparov plays more like Karpov than anyone is willing to admit. The difference in style is really that Kasparov is a bit more ambitious at the board than Karpov, but if you look at games where Karpov goes on the attack, you'd have a hard time telling the difference between them.

trysts
SimonWebbsTiger wrote:

@knowthyself

Petrosian was vastly influenced by Nimzowitsch. He studied Nimzo's writings as a lad.

Someone influenced by Petrosian, and also a great fan of Nimzo, is retired British GM Ray Keene. Keene has written a recently published book about Petrosian and his book on Nimzowitsch is a classic.

I know this wasn't directed towards me, Simon, but thanks! I think I'm due to buy a chess bookWink

SimonWebbsTiger

hehe, no worries trysts. I think you'll enjoy the Keene book on Nimzowitsch if you haven't read it. IMO, definitely the best book he has written. I have several books on Petrosian already so I haven't bought the latest Keene book on Petrosian; Vik Vasiliev's book on Petrosian for Batsford from 1974 is highly recommended if you can pick up a copy, as is the collection of essays published as "Petrosian's Legacy".

Something I didn't realise was how important Petrosian's advice was for a young Garry Kasparov. They played in several tournaments together and the Iron Tiger acted as a mentor to Garry! He speaks about his mentor in the video about his life and games.

trysts
SimonWebbsTiger wrote:

hehe, no worries trysts. I think you'll enjoy the Keene book on Nimzowitsch if you haven't read it. IMO, definitely the best book he has written. I have several books on Petrosian already so I haven't bought the latest Keene book on Petrosian; Vik Vasiliev's book on Petrosian for Batsford from 1974 is highly recommended if you can pick up a copy, as is the collection of essays published as "Petrosian's Legacy".

Something I didn't realise was how important Petrosian's advice was for a young Garry Kasparov. They played in several tournaments together and the Iron Tiger acted as a mentor to Garry! He speaks about his mentor in the video about his life and games.

Thanks again, Simon!Smile

SimonWebbsTiger

@ciljettu

when you see the game Carlsen-Gashimov, Wijk aan Zee 2012, it's like watching Karpov (or perhaps Ulf Andersson!).

Then you see Carlsen plays the Dragon against Anand, the Chigorin against Kramnik or the North Sea Defence against Adams....Karpov never had that, for want of a word, " daring do" about his openings!

cabadenwurt
TheProfessor wrote:

Capablanca was similar in some ways to Karpov.

Just wondering, shouldn't one say: Karpov is in some ways similar to Capablanca ? 

hankas
cabadenwurt wrote:
TheProfessor wrote:

Capablanca was similar in some ways to Karpov.

Just wondering, shouldn't one say: Karpov is in some ways similar to Capablanca ? 

True. Karpov's play is similar to Capablanca, and not the other way around. Karpov had Capablanca's influence. Petrosian however had Nimzowitsch's influence, although in some games Petrosian did play like Capablanca.

SandyJames

Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian

This name is like music to my ears. The boss of the Kings Indian Tongue out

chessnaivete
TheProfessor wrote:

Capablanca was similar in some ways to Karpov.

Accdg. to modern GM's today and computer analysis, Capablanca always plays perfect, flawless and never seen a single weakness on his games. On the contrary to Karpov and kasparov admitted that they'd made a lot of errors during their match. 

helltank

I like them. I like their style, the way they grind their opponents slowly.

My admiration of Tigran Petrosian was marred by this:

 

I am not kidding you. I did not misclick. He actually undeveloped his bishop. Karpov played quite a few inaccurate moves in his lifetime but nothing as big as this, I think. 

pfren

You are kidding us.

The actual moves were 4.e5 Bf8 (against Arnason), first played by Lilienthal via the move order 3...Nf6 4.e5 Ng8.

This a bit bizarre, but positionally it makes sense.