Inspirational Adult Improvers


  • 9 days ago · Quote · #341

    Milliern

    ipcress12 wrote:

     

    Interesting! It's a shame we don't have better data. Clearly the more experience and the earlier the experience the better for developing chess strength, but the parameters are vague.

    I'm somewhat surprised tournament experience isn't mentioned as necessary. That was the crucible for my development. I played skittles with my grandfather and the kids in the neighborhood but it didn't amount to much until I started studying and playing serious games with a clock.

    I think the value of tournament chess is that it initiates an emotional connection with the game (the hippocampus is associated with emotional functions and memory functions, and studies indicate a reciprocal function between memory and emotion), and I think the extremely competitive aspect of tournament play encourages the fullest possible attention and the growth of one's ability to visually attend a position (and over durations).  I'm sure that being a youth, and being more easily emotionally stimulated, is part of the reason for the differences in growth we see between adults and youths. 

  • 9 days ago · Quote · #342

    Chessmo

    Thanks for posting! What did your early chess activity look like? Did you play competitively as a youth, etc?

    Cheers,

    NFork wrote:

    I achieved my NM title 2009 when I was 28 and then as 32 years old I got FM title. It sounds strange that 4 years would mean something: I think I could have gained NM title also as 32 years old if I had started chess some years later.

    As someone already said. I think if person doesn't get the 2200 when he is 30 or younger it's mostly harder as older because people often don't have the time to work with chess.

  • 9 days ago · Quote · #343

    ipcress12

    Thanks for posting! What did your early chess activity look like? Did you play competitively as a youth, etc?

    Chessmo: Assuming you're addressing me ... I learned to play around 14, got interested and started studying at 15, got a few friends interested to study, play blitz and match games at 16, started playing in tournaments at 17, stopped playing at 21 because I wanted to focus on other parts of my life.

    My rating went from 1498 to 1727 with a high of 1759. Almost all my friends went on to expert and master. Perhaps I flatter myself, but I always felt I could have done so too if I had put the work in. Instead I devoted myself to writing and programming, wihch paid the bills.

  • 9 days ago · Quote · #344

    Milliern

    ipcress12 wrote:

    Thanks for posting! What did your early chess activity look like? Did you play competitively as a youth, etc?

    Chessmo: Assuming you're addressing me ... I learned to play around 14, got interested and started studying at 15, got a few friends interested to study, play blitz and match games at 16, started playing in tournaments at 17, stopped playing at 21 because I wanted to focus on other parts of my life.

    My rating went from 1498 to 1727 with a high of 1759. Almost all my friends went on to expert and master. Perhaps I flatter myself, but I always felt I could have done so too if I had put the work in. Instead I devoted myself to writing and programming, wihch paid the bills.

    Ah, Jack, I think Kevin's comment was directed at Jari (FM NFork).  Probably, Kevin was responding through an iPhone, which tend to not disambiguate between the responding text and the text being responded to.

  • 9 days ago · Quote · #345

    ipcress12

    Well, that's my story for what it's worth. I'm glad to  know I have the early experience chess box checked.

  • 9 days ago · Quote · #346

    richie_and_oprah

    Milliern wrote:

     I'm sure that being a youth, and being more easily emotionally stimulated, is part of the reason for the differences in growth we see between adults and youths. 


    Neuralplasticity is the reason.

  • 9 days ago · Quote · #347

    Milliern

    richie_and_oprah wrote:
    Milliern wrote:

     I'm sure that being a youth, and being more easily emotionally stimulated, is part of the reason for the differences in growth we see between adults and youths. 


    Neuralplasticity is the reason.

    You can't use a definite article when there are multiple contributing factors; but neuroplasticity is the primary one.

  • 9 days ago · Quote · #349

    dfgh123

    children also get encouraged and praised a lot which helps whilst adults get shut down and ignored

  • 9 days ago · Quote · #350

    Chessmo

    Ha, ha. Yes, telling your neighbors and work colleagues that you want to spend 25 hours a week studying how to play a boardgames doesn't usually garner positive reactions. Fortunately I've never cared much for others opinions of how to live my life and that has worked out well enough for me. ;-)

  • 9 days ago · Quote · #351

    fran2c9

    francisco


Back to Top

Post your reply: