Tigran Petrosian

varelse1

Very interesting Spassky

Goram

 Then too, players like Korchnoi did not like Petrosian's style,

Source?as Korchnoi had a similar style to Petrosian that many will agree.

SeniorPatzer
Muzammil-Muhammad wrote:
Goram wrote:

as Korchnoi had a similar style to Petrosian that many will agree.

No. These two had really different styles. According to Spassky "Korchnoi is sharp and combinative with a sure killer instinct in tactical situations. Petrosian is probably the best positional player alive. And he's got cold steel wires where other people have nerves. I think that Petrosian's greater experience and more solid play is going to tell against Korchnoi. Petrosian is a unique match pugilist. His forte is that he is almost uncatchable – he tries to keep his opponent at his own distance, so that at the convenient moment he will be able to take resolute action ... he is a tiger getting ready to pounce on his victim ... in matches draws cannot affect the outcome ... therefore such a style as Petrosian is much more dangerous in matches. Korchnoi can be described as a searching chess player .. more a destroyer of the other player’s plans and positons than a creator .. (he) has a tendency not to trust his intuition; rather, he relies on cold hard calculation .. more a tournament player than a match player .. Petrosian is a tough opponent for Korchnoi. After all, during the course of the struggle Korchnoi has to be able to discover his opponent’s plan in order to begin "destroying it". But Petrosian’s style is often based on waiting, manoeuvring “semi-tones"." 

And their semi final match in 1971 was also rigged. "It was already clear that whoever won would have to face Fischer, who was swiftly ascending to the chess throne .. our Sports Committee decided that that it was better to stop him on his march. Petrosian and Korchnoi were summoned and bluntly asked which of them had the greater chance against Fischer. Korchnoi replied that in the "Fischer age" almost no one had a chance, but Petrosian said that he believed in himself. At that Korchnoi was asked to throw the match to Petrosian, in compensation for which he would be sent to the three biggest international tournaments (for a Soviet chess player at that time this was a regal present) ... No documents exist to substantiate this plot. But the mediocrity of Korchnoi's play and the fact that, considering his bitter nature, after he lost to Petrosian he remained on good terms with him implies that Korchnoi let Petrosian win."    -Karpov, Memoirs of a Chess World Champion, p. 114.

 

Wow.  Wow!  Karpov publicly admitted that the Russians colluded?   They allowed him to publish this?  That's remarkable.

escksn

He had a bad childhood. Incredible to reach this level from limited resources. I guess his later years would be happier.

Aashay77

People say that petrosian is a very defensive player but when i watched his games i did not find so I think he starts his attacks when his opponent has finished attacking Lol

chuddog

I'm surprised no one from Armenia has commented on this thread. Separately from his playing style, Petrosian was crucial to the development of chess in Armenia, which is now one of the strongest chess playing nations in the world. Without Petrosian, there would be no Aronian, and no repeated chess Olympiad wins for the Armenian team. They all cite him as their influence and inspiration. No one finds Aronian's chess boring. He's a modern chess artist and magician. Well, you have Petrosian to thank for that.

varelse1
Muzammil-Muhammad wrote:
Goram wrote:

as Korchnoi had a similar style to Petrosian that many will agree.

No. These two had really different styles. According to Spassky "Korchnoi is sharp and combinative with a sure killer instinct in tactical situations. Petrosian is probably the best positional player alive. And he's got cold steel wires where other people have nerves. I think that Petrosian's greater experience and more solid play is going to tell against Korchnoi. Petrosian is a unique match pugilist. His forte is that he is almost uncatchable – he tries to keep his opponent at his own distance, so that at the convenient moment he will be able to take resolute action ... he is a tiger getting ready to pounce on his victim ... in matches draws cannot affect the outcome ... therefore such a style as Petrosian is much more dangerous in matches. Korchnoi can be described as a searching chess player .. more a destroyer of the other player’s plans and positons than a creator .. (he) has a tendency not to trust his intuition; rather, he relies on cold hard calculation .. more a tournament player than a match player .. Petrosian is a tough opponent for Korchnoi. After all, during the course of the struggle Korchnoi has to be able to discover his opponent’s plan in order to begin "destroying it". But Petrosian’s style is often based on waiting, manoeuvring “semi-tones"." 

And their semi final match in 1971 was also rigged. "It was already clear that whoever won would have to face Fischer, who was swiftly ascending to the chess throne .. our Sports Committee decided that that it was better to stop him on his march. Petrosian and Korchnoi were summoned and bluntly asked which of them had the greater chance against Fischer. Korchnoi replied that in the "Fischer age" almost no one had a chance, but Petrosian said that he believed in himself. At that Korchnoi was asked to throw the match to Petrosian, in compensation for which he would be sent to the three biggest international tournaments (for a Soviet chess player at that time this was a regal present) ... No documents exist to substantiate this plot. But the mediocrity of Korchnoi's play and the fact that, considering his bitter nature, after he lost to Petrosian he remained on good terms with him implies that Korchnoi let Petrosian win."    -Karpov, Memoirs of a Chess World Champion, p. 114.

Yes, I think Kortchnoi and Petrosian were complete opposites.

Petrosian left no weaknesses in his position, if he could help it. Preventing his opponents attacks, before it even started,

On the other hand, Kortchnoi would create weaknesses in his own camp, seemingly for no reason at all. That was because he wanted his opponent to attack him. And preferably, sacrifice material, doing it. These were the situations where Victor's talents for counter-punching really shined.