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"Conditional Moves" Function?

  • #1

    Hello, 

    I am curious about what the "Conditional Moves" feature is actually designed for?  What is it's purpose?  Does anyone here have a good use for it?  How is it different than the analysis function?

    I'm trying to stay away from using the analysis function because I am currently working on improving my calculation skills, therefore, I am reading more and performing as many calculations in my head as possible.  I play OTB and obviously not allowed to move pieces so calculation is imperative.

  • #2

    It dates back to correspondence chess by post. If your opponent had a forced move or virtually forced move, you wanted to say "If you recapture my queen, I move my rook to d1" and save two lots of postage and the full round trip time.

    Unlike in postal chess, your opponents in Daily Chess here don't know if there are conditional moves or not. I do use them for obvious (required) recapture and also for forced mate sequences where my opponent wants to play on to checkmate.

    They're a very optional feature and you can enter bad moves as well as good moves. Some people like and use the feature, some don't. All up to the user.

    Cheers!

  • #3

    so the app will make the moves for you?

  • #4

    App, web interface ... doesn't matter. If your opponent plays the predicted move (or one of them if you set up multiple lines, which at least premium  members can do) some message pops up saying (this is from memory) "You have triggered a conditional move" and the response you set up is played and it's your opponent's turn to move again.

    Set up the mate in six one evening, wake up the following morning and it's all played out. Nice when it works. happy.png

  • #5
  • #6

    I only use conditional move when I am one move away from checkmating my opponent and they have no way of stopping it, so that the system makes the final move for me without having to open the game.

  • #7

    That's pretty fantastic.  I would love to go to sleep one day and wake up with the moves all played out...I tried a bunch yesterday, but I didn't notice if it worked.  I'll keep trying.  Thanks for your time.

  • #8

    It works if you correctly predict your opponents' moves; otherwise nothing happens.

    You get into trouble when you put bad moves in and your opponent moves before you manage to delete the line of play!

    It's a useful feature, but worthy of care in use, if you choose to use it. Not everyone likes it, which is fine.

  • #9

    I've used it thus far for forced mating sequences which is awesome.  One phenomenon I seem to encounter quite often are when opponents start to slow play me once I've established a strong position and more than likely will win the game.  It's a pretty chickenshit tactic but I've encountered at least 50 different players that do the same thing.  I guess I was cut from a different cloth because win or lose, I continue to move my pieces and move on with my life instead of dragging out a lost game for weeks or even months on end.  So now I can put in my moves so if the opponent moves when I am not online or near my phone, the app will make the moves for me and hopefully keep the game going a little quicker.  I've noticed it is quite handy, but I agree with your warning about not playing bad moves.  I'll probably just use it for the opening sequences and mating sequences at the beginning and ending of the game.

  • #10
    TheSultan31003 wrote:

     

    I'm trying to stay away from using the analysis function because I am currently working on improving my calculation skills, therefore, I am reading more and performing as many calculations in my head as possible.  I play OTB and obviously not allowed to move pieces so calculation is imperative.

    I would stay away from it, if you are using correspondence games for calculation training.  

     

    I do Stoykos and combination training for calculation training, so I have used the conditional moves function.  However, I write down all the lines I analyze in my head, without moving the pieces.  I write an evaluation next to each line, which is something I'm struggling with versus 2200-2350 rated players --evaluating a position 4+ moves down the road, even if it is easy to calculate through forced moves.  I later go back, after the game, and compare with an engine, and then consult my coaches on any of the errors I made, since it's often not possible to understand engine evaluations.  Any moves that I feel I've confidently analyzed and know my response, I plug in the conditional move lines.  I sometimes spend absurd amounts of time analyzing a position, so I'll have many sensible moves accounted for, so I plug them into the conditional moves function as anticipated responses.

  • #11
    TheSultan31003 wrote:

    Hello, 

    I am curious about what the "Conditional Moves" feature is actually designed for?  What is it's purpose?  Does anyone here have a good use for it?  How is it different than the analysis function?

    I'm trying to stay away from using the analysis function because I am currently working on improving my calculation skills, therefore, I am reading more and performing as many calculations in my head as possible.  I play OTB and obviously not allowed to move pieces so calculation is imperative.>>>

    Hello, personally, I find that the analysis feature aids my calculation in my head during otb games. It only requires a change of attitude and one can analyse systematically, as one would wish to do with the analysis feature properly used. So I think it strengthens my analysis ability.

    Regarding conditional moves, it's a great help. If one analyses carefully the most critical lines including all of the opponent's best replies, then if the main line is followed, one doesn't have to reanalyse the position due to forgetting the nuances after three days. I've often entered five or ten moves and returned to find I've won the game. Perhaps, also, it can make an opponent move too fast and blunder. When a game is won and one knows it, there's nothing lost if the opponent makes the process a bit quicker.

     

  • #12
    Milliern wrote:
    TheSultan31003 wrote:

     

    I'm trying to stay away from using the analysis function because I am currently working on improving my calculation skills, therefore, I am reading more and performing as many calculations in my head as possible.  I play OTB and obviously not allowed to move pieces so calculation is imperative.

    I would stay away from it, if you are using correspondence games for calculation training.  

     

    I do Stoykos and combination training for calculation training, so I have used the conditional moves function.  However, I write down all the lines I analyze in my head, without moving the pieces.  I write an evaluation next to each line, which is something I'm struggling with versus 2200-2350 rated players --evaluating a position 4+ moves down the road, even if it is easy to calculate through forced moves.  I later go back, after the game, and compare with an engine, and then consult my coaches on any of the errors I made, since it's often not possible to understand engine evaluations.  Any moves that I feel I've confidently analyzed and know my response, I plug in the conditional move lines.  I sometimes spend absurd amounts of time analyzing a position, so I'll have many sensible moves accounted for, so I plug them into the conditional moves function as anticipated responses.

    Yes totally agree on working on calculation without moving pieces.  My coach has been very adamant about it.  We analyze my OTB games every week in addition to playing practice games where I speak my thoughts aloud and he can get a sense of where I am strong or weak and adjust accordingly.

     

    The bulk of my calculation training comes from solving positional and or tactical positions either from a book or from my coach.  He has me work thru forcing sequences to the point of quiescence to get my reach further and further.  It's been very helpful thus far.

     

    What is Stoykos?

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