4/20/2019 - Gorgiev, 1923

ConsciousSoul

It is hard puzzle as endgame specialization is like having most precious gem. 

fightingbob
SRTEJAS2009 wrote:

can someone solve this

white to move

You mean pin, check, pin, check, pin, check, pin, check, pin, check, pin, mate.

Shannon_number

happy.png

fightingbob

This endgame composition was by Tigran Gorgiev (1910–1976).  According to his listing among the chess endgame study composers at Wikipedia, he was a "Russian composer of about 500 studies. He is considered among the major reperesentatives (sic) of the grotesque genre, in which the initial position cannot be reached in practical play. He won 31 first prizes."  That grotesque genre is not in evidence here; this instructive study could very easily have occurred in a game.

To see all pertinent variations to this study click here.  The date of composition was 1936, not 1923, and Gorgiev received 2nd Honorable Mention for a competition that was sponsored by the Leningrad Central Chess Club according to this website.

Naturally, studies and problems are an afterthought at Chess.com where Speed and Bullet reign supreme, so don't ever expect accuracy.  Check it out yourself.

Rocky64

Thanks for the informative links, Bob!

This study seems rather advanced and even with the help of tablebases I had trouble wrapping my head around it. Anyway, you'd know from my blogs that I find mutual zugzwang interesting, and this study actually shows multiple instances of it! The brilliant tempo move 11.b3!! suggests some sort of zugzwang is happening, and the Syzygy TB indicates that not only does this move puts Black in zugzwang, but if White is to move again after 11.b3, White would also be in zugzwang and there's no win. Here's an exercise to demonstrate the mutual zugzwangs (MZ).

(1) Click here to open the Syzygy TB with the position after 11.b3!! already set up. 

(2) The analysis shows that Black to play is lost. Now click the 'White to move' button, and it turns out to be a disadvantage for White to have the move here, and Black would draw no matter what White does. That is, MZ #1.

(3) Switch back to 'Black to move' and play the next 2 moves of the solution, 11...Kg4 12.Ke3.

(4) Black is lost here, but click 'White to move', and again the win is gone. MZ #2.

(5) Switch back to 'Black to move' and play 12...Kf5 12.Kd4.

(4) Black is lost here, but click 'White to move', and again the win is gone. MZ #3.

The fun has to end eventually... Switch to 'Black to move' and play 13...Ke6 14.Kc5. This isn't a zugzwang anymore for either side: click 'White to move' here and White would still win with Kb6. In other words, 14.Kc5 wins by threatening 15.Kb6, not by putting Black in zugzwang.

 

 

fightingbob

Great post, Peter.  For some reason I didn't know about the Syzygy 7-piece tablebase website, but I do now; it's been bookmarked.

nightdaydream

The first moves are easy, but we must understand what happens if we change one black move.
First line: 1. h5 Ke6, 2. h6 Kf6, 3. Ke8 Kg6, 4. h7 Kxh7, 5. Kxf7 Kh8, 6. b4 Kh7, 7. Ke6 Kg7, 8. Kd6 Kf7, 9. Kc6 Ke6, 10. Kb6 Kd6, 11. Kxa6 Kc7, 12. b5 Kc8, 13. Ka7 Kc7, 14. b6+ Kc8, 15. b7+ Kd7, 16. b8=Q and White wins.
Second line: 1. h5 Ke6, 2. h6 Kf6, 3. Ke8 Kg6, 4. h7 Kxh7, 5. Kxf7 Kh6, 6. Kf6 Kh7, 7. b4 Kg8, 8. Ke6 Kf8, 9. Kd6 Ke8, 10. Kc6 Ke7, 11. Kb6 Kd6, 12. Kxa6 Kc7, 13. b5 Kb8, 14. Kb6 Kc8, 15. Ka7 Kc7, 16. b6+ Kc8, 17. b7+ Kd7, 18. b8=Q and White wins.
Third line: 1. h5 Ke6, 2. h6 Kf6, 3. Ke8 Kg6, 4. h7 Kxh7, 5. Kxf7 Kh6, 6. Kf6 Kh5, 7. Kf5 Kh6, 8. b4 Kg7, 9. Ke6 Kg6, 10. Kd6 Kf5, 11. Kc6 Ke6, 12. Kb6 Kd5, 13. Kxa6 Kc6, 14. b5+ Kc7, 15. Ka7 Kc8, 16. b6 Kd7, 17. b7 Ke6, 18. b8=Q and White wins.
Fourth line: 1. h5 Ke6, 2. h6 Kf6, 3. Ke8 Kg6, 4. h7 Kxh7, 5. Kxf7 Kh6, 6. Kf6 Kh5, 7. Kf5 Kh4, 8. Kf4 Kh5, 9. b4 Kg6, 10. Ke5 Kf7, 11. Kd6 Kf6, 12. Kc6 Ke5, 13. Kb6 Kd5, 14. Kxa6 Kc6, 15. b5+ Kc7, 16. Ka7 Kc8, 17. b6 Kd7, 18. b7 Ke6, 19. b8=Q
Now, we can understand why black King goes to h2. Let's see a bad line for White.
Fifth line: 1. h5 Ke6, 2. h6 Kf6, 3. Ke8 Kg6, 4. h7 Kxh7, 5. Kxf7 Kh6, 6. Kf6 Kh5, 7. Kf5 Kh4, 8. Kf4 Kh3, 9. Ke3 Kg2, 10. Kd3 Kf2, 11. b4 Kf3, 12. Kc4 Ke4, 13. Kc5 Kd3, 14. Kb6 Kc4, 15. Kxa6 Kxb4 1/2 1/2. Now, we can understand the solution!

Hjin27

I did it!happy.png

 



Hjin27

😄😉😉😉😉😉😉😉😉😊😊😊😊😊😊😊😊😊

Hjin27

😛😛😃😃😀😀😮😮😯😯😴😴

Hjin27

If Black premoves f6, Kf7, Kg6, Kh5 and you can't stop him, how do you checkmate

holmos17

ok