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4/5/2012 - Mate in 3

  • #121

    I guess.

    SZ.

  • #122

    Good one.

  • #123
    damongross wrote:

    At Kandykween: consider what happens if white is allowed to move his advanced pawn to the eighth rank and promote it to a queen.  What is stopping white from doing this?

     

    I looked at the puzzle again and now I get it! It would be a check, right? And the black queen would take and the whole thing would collapse, right? So... the white queen baits the black queen... but the black queen doesn't take because... um... (I'm sorry I'm stupid at this!) it would be checkmate because the black queen wouldn't be protecting/guarding the square, so white would promote and it would be checkmate? 

     

    Oh, now I get it! Thanks!

     

    (What's this type of move-thing called?!)

  • #124

    nice

  • #125
    PuzzlCritic wrote:

    Why would the black queen not take the white queen? Also, with a white pawn on the verge of queening, I kept trying to use it.  And if in the end you're just going to end up winning by putting the queen up there and taking the other queen, couldn't you do that in two moves by moving the queen up in the first move?  Counter intuitive, but a very creative puzzle.

    Checking with the queen on the back rank on the first move doesn't work because the king still has an escape square. After it moves to g8 to avoid the first check, it can't escape anymore.

  • #126

    Cool. Didn't see the first move though

  • #127

    Very, very easy

  • #128

    Have one more possibilite but the system says that its wrong...

  • #129

    @kandykween: overburdening the Q (it has to prepare for two things, and there is no square fromm where it can do both); or, deflection (luring it away from the defence of an essential square = d8).

  • #130

    easy

  • #131

    one

  • #132

    Wouldn't first move Qa3 work just as well?  He still has to move Kg8, and even though the next move Qe7 doesn't put him in check, there's not a move he can make to stop mate on your next move.

  • #133
    ghamilto61 wrote:

    Wouldn't first move Qa3 work just as well?  He still has to move Kg8, and even though the next move Qe7 doesn't put him in check, there's not a move he can make to stop mate on your next move.

    See post #58, it's not mate-in-3 anymore.

    And FYI, if you want to move 2. Qe7, then you've allowed the Black queen to start the harassment of the White King.

    2....Qd5+ and the chase begins all over the board

  • #134

    Surprised

  • #135

    Laughing

  • #136

    not too shabby!

  • #137
    ZacWilson wrote:

    By offering up the Queen to remove it from defending a key square on the bank rank are we employing the concept of DECOY or DEFLECTION?  Anyone know the "proper" answer?  I know they are similar.  Wondering what the defining difference is between the terms.

    I've only heard the term "deflection" used for a situation where a piece is enticed or forced from the defense of a key square/diagonal/rank/file. I would guess "decoy" means the same thing but isn't as widely used.

    Edit: Actually according to wikipedia, a decoy is when you lure a piece to a specific bad square, whereas a deflection lures it to any square where it can no longer adequately defend the threat. So a decoy would be a specific type of deflection (if I understood it correctly).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_terminology#D

  • #138

    dang it i couldnt get it

  • #139

    cute first move.....nice

  • #140
    Jeffmon wrote:

    I've only heard the term "deflection" used for a situation where a piece is enticed or forced from the defense of a key square/diagonal/rank/file. I would guess "decoy" means the same thing but isn't as widely used.

    Edit: Actually according to wikipedia, a decoy is when you lure a piece to a specific bad square, whereas a deflection lures it to any square where it can no longer adequately defend. So a decoy would be a specific type of deflection (if I understood it correctly).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_terminology#D

    Thats how I understood it when I learned it.  Decoying gets a piece to a bad square, generally to capture it later in the line.  Deflection just gets them away from defense of a key square/rank/diagonal, not necessarily to put it in danger, but to take advantage when the piece is overloaded, as the Black Queen is on this puzzle.

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