5/16/2018 - Exposing Improper Kingside Development

mathmaster74

Both sides begin with equal (full) material. 1. Bxh6 removes a pesky defender of the f7 square and gives White a 3 point material advantage if not followed by 1. …  gxh6 because White can then retreat with 2. Be3 (for example). Black’s position here before 1. …  gxh6 is ugly. Black has no immediate threats. Yes, 1. …  gxh6 is an even worse alternative to the current position (doubled h-pawns and no kingside castle wall), but with Black’s poor development, one hardly expects strong play to suddenly kick in. Black may think the half-open g-file for the h8-rook is attractive, too. Next, White plays 2. Ng5 to threaten 3. Bf7+  Ke7 (forced) and 4. Nd5#. If instead of 2. Ng5, White played 2. Nxe5 here, then the response is 2. …  Nxe5 and Black has replaced the h6 Knight which once defended f7.  Black needs to take the Knight or defend f7 to avoid the mate.  In the puzzle, Black takes the Knight. Whether Black plays 2. …  hxg5 or 2. …  fxg5, the result is the same... 3. Qh5+  Ke7 (forced) allowing 4. Qf7#. This implies that defending f7 is the better move…but how? 2. … Qe7 is met with 3. Nd5!! which forks the Queen, the c7 square, and the f6 square!  Black’s best defense against this triple threat seems to be to back up a step with 3. … Qd8??, but then 4. Qh5#. In fact, if 2. … Qe7 meets with 3. Nd5!! Black loses the Queen if not moved on 3., and loses the Queen to a discovered check if 3. …  Qe6 or 3. …  Qf7 after 4. Nxc7+!! This implies the only way for Black to play 2. … Qe7 and not immediately lose the Queen to 3. Nd5!! Is to play 3. …  Qg7 which still allows 4. Nxc7+  Kd8  then 5. Nxa8 wins a rook and White maintains far superior space, position, and material to secure a comfortable win. How else can f7 be defended?  One comment suggests foreseeing the Queen attack on h5 and setting up a block with 2. …  Ne7 allowing 3. Qh5 to get blocked by 3. …  Ng6. This would be a great way to defend f7 if not for 3. Bf7#.  So what’s left? 2. …  Be6.  This move, however, allows White to not only save the Knight on g5…but gives it new life after 3. Nxe6! Now White’s Knight forks a Queen, Bishop, and the c7 square immediately after being allowed to live and capture a Bishop in the process!  Black is “playing poorly” because there are no real alternatives.

ishanram
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ishanram
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sc123

Nice one.

 

BryanCFB
mathmaster74 wrote:

Both sides begin with equal (full) material. 1. Bxh6 removes a pesky defender of the f7 square and gives White a 3 point material advantage if not followed by 1. …  gxh6 because White can then retreat with 2. Be3 (for example). Black’s position here before 1. …  gxh6 is ugly. Black has no immediate threats. Yes, 1. …  gxh6 is an even worse alternative to the current position (doubled h-pawns and no kingside castle wall), but with Black’s poor development, one hardly expects strong play to suddenly kick in. Black may think the half-open g-file for the h8-rook is attractive, too. Next, White plays 2. Ng5 to threaten 3. Bf7+  Ke7 (forced) and 4. Nd5#. If instead of 2. Ng5, White played 2. Nxe5 here, then the response is 2. …  Nxe5 and Black has replaced the h6 Knight which once defended f7.  Black needs to take the Knight or defend f7 to avoid the mate.  In the puzzle, Black takes the Knight. Whether Black plays 2. …  hxg5 or 2. …  fxg5, the result is the same... 3. Qh5+  Ke7 (forced) allowing 4. Qf7#. This implies that defending f7 is the better move…but how? 2. … Qe7 is met with 3. Nd5!! which forks the Queen, the c7 square, and the f6 square!  Black’s best defense against this triple threat seems to be to back up a step with 3. … Qd8??, but then 4. Qh5#. In fact, if 2. … Qe7 meets with 3. Nd5!! Black loses the Queen if not moved on 3., and loses the Queen to a discovered check if 3. …  Qe6 or 3. …  Qf7 after 4. Nxc7+!! This implies the only way for Black to play 2. … Qe7 and not immediately lose the Queen to 3. Nd5!! Is to play 3. …  Qg7 which still allows 4. Nxc7+  Kd8  then 5. Nxa8 wins a rook and White maintains far superior space, position, and material to secure a comfortable win. How else can f7 be defended?  One comment suggests foreseeing the Queen attack on h5 and setting up a block with 2. …  Ne7 allowing 3. Qh5 to get blocked by 3. …  Ng6. This would be a great way to defend f7 if not for 3. Bf7#.  So what’s left? 2. …  Be6.  This move, however, allows White to not only save the Knight on g5…but gives it new life after 3. Nxe6! Now White’s Knight forks a Queen, Bishop, and the c7 square immediately after being allowed to live and capture a Bishop in the process!  Black is “playing poorly” because there are no real alternatives.

Probably best for black to play 1...g6 and be down a knight.  If it gets as far as 1. Bxh6! gxh6 2. Ng5!! then black is severly doomed.

kindlestenssoro
fightingbob wrote:

A modified Scholar's Mate, and just like the original Scholar's Mate, it needs a little help to succeed.  Here it is Black's second move that leads directly to his doom, and in the original it's Black's poor third move.

Exposing improper kingside development leads to Fool's Mate

orenzmendoza

solved

susi2005

so easy posiston

 

Bultai

Wonderful

kindlestenssoro

4.Qf7# foolish, isn't it?