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6/15/2013 - Calculation

  • #141

    Difficult One

  • #142

    Solved! =]

  • #143

    I actually solved that one, unusual.

  • #144
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #145

    interesting

  • #146

    nf1 wouldn't change anything because

    of the following puzzle
  • #147

    page 9

  • #148

    it is ok

  • #149

    Cool

  • #150

    Chess problems are supposed to end in white checkmating.  I hate these.  If the win state isn't going to be checkmate (which is a ridiculous idea in itself), would it be too much to ask that each puzzle has a description of the win state -- mate in 4, white to play and win, white to capture a queen, something?

  • #151

    If you state somethink like White to capture a queen you just about give the whole problem away. However White to play and  win would be ok.

    Of if it is a mate say how many moves is also ok.

  • #152
    delgreer wrote:

    Chess problems are supposed to end in white checkmating.  I hate these.  If the win state isn't going to be checkmate (which is a ridiculous idea in itself), would it be too much to ask that each puzzle has a description of the win state -- mate in 4, white to play and win, white to capture a queen, something?

    Even though the ultimate goal in chess is to achieve checkmate, it is not always immediate and cannot always be pinpointed to a certain number of moves (at least by humans).  Puzzles such as these are good because they are a realistic representation of what one usually has to go through in order to win a chess game.  The mate in "x" amount of moves are not always available to us in our games.

    I suppose it would be helpful if Chess.com would provide an explanation of why the final position in a puzzle is winning (if not checkmate) or drawing.  However, in any puzzle I've ever done and wondered about the final position, this answer has been discussed in the comments section.  So I would suggest reading through the comments.  They will be very helpful.

  • #153

    IT WAS SO EASY❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗⭕❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗⭕❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗❗

  • #154

    Actually the puzzle is incomplete because White has NOT won anything yet. Black will fork the White King and Queen, winning the Queen. White still has a few more CORRECT moves that are mandatory, and if not made correctly, will NOT result in a White win. White could blunder, and end up LOSING or DRAWING if the rest of the sequence is NOT played out correctly. Not until White captures the Black rook and ends up a full bishop ahead in the end game is White out of the woods. So, this puzzle is NOT sufficient and to say that White has won after capturing the Black Queen is not correct. White SHOULD WIN, yes, but it is NOT inevitable. Blunders happen all the time.

  • #155

    nice

  • #156

    Whoa!

  • #157
    vnitturi wrote:

    nf1 wouldn't change anything because

     

    of the following puzzle

    Thank you for explaining! That was driving me crazy!

  • #158

    The calculations is not over yet!

    The moves 4...Nf1+ 5 Kf2! have to be calculated too!

    Now White threatens 6 Qxh6# and if 5...Nxe3 6 Ng6+ Kh7 7 Bxd8 Kxg6 8 Kxe3 and White wins!

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