8/30/2010 - Multiple Tactical Motifs at Once

  • #101

    double check on the queen.. :D

  • #102

    easy

  • #103

    this one sucked

  • #104

    first!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • #105

    :)

  • #106

    this is really nothing gained nothing lost if ... Re1+ Kh2 white gets the Q but loses R&B if ...Re1+  Rxe1 , bxc4 and white gets a rook for a bishop & only a 1 pt advantage , it's a matter of preference , personally I'd prefer to be even with my opponents queen off the board with possession of my own + bishop and five pawns against six. Undecided

  • #107
    DaveLacey wrote:

    I'm going to make an attempt to communicate the point of a tactics puzzle.  A tactics puzzle is an exercise in winning material or checkmating.  In this puzzle, white wins material.  Finding the way to do this is the point of the exercise.  It is not a huge material gain, but that is beside the point.  It doesn't matter if you think black still has hopes or if white has to work hard to win.  Why do so many people think that the puzzle is flawed unless the outcome is either checkmate or some kind of massive material advantage?


    Because every puzzle I have done in my life before chess.com has been " the puzzle is flawed unless the outcome is either checkmate or some kind of massive material advantage" !

    Otherwise any given game can produce dozens of puzzles, like taking a pawn makes a point, would that be a puzzle for you?

  • #108

    In reply to ElectRobert,

    I should add to my definition of a puzzle that it is an exercise in winning material through tactics or combinative play.  Yes, if one can win a pawn through some kind of tactical combination, that would definitely be a puzzle.  Winning a pawn can help you win the game.  So exercises in which you have to find combinative sequences that win even modest amounts of material are good practice, because this helps you win games through tactical means.

    I don't know where you are doing puzzles, but in my experience whilst many lead to large material gains or checkmate, I have seen loads of puzzles from various sources where the gain is simply a pawn, an exchange, or a queen for rook and minor piece.  Check out the highly regarded "1001 winning chess sacrifices and combinations" by Fred Reinfeld for tons of examples along these lines.  If you can't get a hold of the book, type the title into an internet search engine and you will find at least one website that allows you to download the puzzles from the book for free.

    It is true that puzzles can be extracted from pretty much any game, because there are tactics flying around in any game of chess!  But as long as you haven't seen the game, then the position will be new to you and the task of finding the right combination to win material will be a good exercise for your tactical pattern recogntion and calculation skills, no matter what amount of material gain the puzzle involves.

  • #109
    DaveLacey wrote:

    In reply to ElectRobert,

    I should add to my definition of a puzzle that it is an exercise in winning material through tactics or combinative play.  Yes, if one can win a pawn through some kind of tactical combination, that would definitely be a puzzle.  Winning a pawn can help you win the game.  So exercises in which you have to find combinative sequences that win even modest amounts of material are good practice, because this helps you win games through tactical means.

    I don't know where you are doing puzzles, but in my experience whilst many lead to large material gains or checkmate, I have seen loads of puzzles from various sources where the gain is simply a pawn, an exchange, or a queen for rook and minor piece.  Check out the highly regarded "1001 winning chess sacrifices and combinations" by Fred Reinfeld for tons of examples along these lines.  If you can't get a hold of the book, type the title into an internet search engine and you will find at least one website that allows you to download the puzzles from the book for free.

    It is true that puzzles can be extracted from pretty much any game, because there are tactics flying around in any game of chess!  But as long as you haven't seen the game, then the position will be new to you and the task of finding the right combination to win material will be a good exercise for your tactical pattern recogntion and calculation skills, no matter what amount of material gain the puzzle involves.


     A quick scan of your long reply tells me that you are either diverting the point or didn't understand my answer. The majority of poster here just like me don't see a chess puzzle as you do. I think this should simply end the discusion.

    Another disagreement would be the pawn gain example to be a puzzle and that sure would be significant for high ranking players, but be honest now do you think this puzzle is the result of one of those high ranking games? (If you plan to answer please keep it short and to the point.) 

  • #110

    A quick scan may not have been long enough to understand my reply.  I was not diverting the point, but building an argument as to why a puzzle that results in a small material gain through tactical means is useful for one's chess development.

    If you wanted to end the discussion, then why continue it in the second paragraph of your previous reply?

  • #111

    Great one

  • #112

    Nice

  • #113

    really good!

  • #114
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #115
    crispus wrote:

    this is really nothing gained nothing lost if ... Re1+ Kh2 white gets the Q but loses R&B if ...Re1+  Rxe1 , bxc4 and white gets a rook for a bishop & only a 1 pt advantage , it's a matter of preference , personally I'd prefer to be even with my opponents queen off the board with possession of my own + bishop and five pawns against six.


    Thks to solution...

    this just to getting queen... but gg :)

  • #116

  • #117

    Perfect pin.

  • #118

    very good

  • #119

    Took me a while to see that - I must be tired !

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