Bishop endgame

Spiffe

I got to this position in a recent game, having obviously followed the precept of placing one's pawns on opposite color from your bishop.  Clearly White isn't worse, but I found myself struggling a bit about how to make progress.  I did end up converting the win, but I'd like to hear from some endgame experts about how they would have proceeded from here.  White to move.

 

Trexler3241

1.Bd3 Bf3 2.f5 gxf5 3.Bxf5 Kc6 =

1.g4 hxg4 2.Bxg4 f5 3.Be2 =

...

1.b5 axb5 2.Bxb5 +-

gaberovtosica

Spiffe напишал:

I got to this position in a recent game, having obviously followed the precept of placing one's pawns on opposite color from your bishop.  Clearly White isn't worse, but I found myself struggling a bit about how to make progress.  I did end up converting the win, but I'd like to hear from some endgame experts about how they would have proceeded from here.  White to move.

 

Spiffe напишал: I got to this position in a recent game, having obviously followed the precept of placing one's pawns on opposite color from your bishop.  Clearly White isn't worse, but I found myself struggling a bit about how to make progress.  I did end up converting the win, but I'd like to hear from some endgame experts about how they would have proceeded from here.  White to move. 

KeSetoKaiba

I'd probably begin with g4. Ideas are more important than exact moves though. The idea behind g4 is to try and get a strong h-pawn with the motif of the "breakthrough." If allowed, then at the proper time g4, f5 and such will let the h-pawn run down the board. Black will have to chase down the decoying h-pawn and then White infiltrates the Queenside with either King or Bishop for a simple theoretical win for White. 

As White I would enjoy having the position after 1.g4 hxg4 2.Bxg4 f5 3.Be2 (Trexler3241 mentioned this line). I believe this line favors White (although I personally would probably go back with 3.Bd1 instead [but it probably doesn't make much difference]). I like Bd1 since Ba4 is then a potential option for future infiltration. 

2015sakk

Hello! Not only white isn't worse. It has a winning endgame. The problem is for black, that his king can't realy move. (any king moves loses quickly.) So the moving remains for the black bishop, but he has way  less squares to move than white bishop, because all of the black pawns are sleeping on white squares...I managed to beat the computer from here, basicly using the ideas that KeSetoKaiba mentioned a post earlier. Also put some additional lines. Black pawns become a target sooner or later, and black can't hold the position when the open h pawn starts running.

 

KeSetoKaiba

2015sakk, I will admit though that you seemed to calculate just a few more moves than I did. This is especially true for the alternate lines presented. Mentally, I had the feeling that White was better and so I then thought about what my plans to improve the position would be for White. For the most part, I generally stopped calculating when I felt that White had compensation for the move(s) in question; it is nice to see someone give more thought to the position and add onto what plans I had considered. 

I think that one way to practice for most chess players is to not become cognitive meiser; calculate! Sure my endgame intuition is correct more often than not (due to practice and study which anyone can do to), but it is fallible; calculation essentially "proves" what you felt as true or not (assuming the calculation was correct and not missing anything, which is always an assumption in itself xD). 2015sakk, I guess that is one reason you are slightly higher rated than me at the moment; it seems you are slightly more willing to calculate one move or two deeper happy.png

2015sakk
KeSetoKaiba wrote:

2015sakk, I will admit though that you seemed to calculate just a few more moves than I did. This is especially true for the alternate lines presented. Mentally, I had the feeling that White was better and so I then thought about what my plans to improve the position would be for White. For the most part, I generally stopped calculating when I felt that White had compensation for the move(s) in question; it is nice to see someone give more thought to the position and add onto what plans I had considered. 

I think that one way to practice for most chess players is to not become cognitive meiser; calculate! Sure my endgame intuition is correct more often than not (due to practice and study which anyone can do to), but it is fallible; calculation essentially "proves" what you felt as true or not (assuming the calculation was correct and not missing anything, which is always an assumption in itself xD). 2015sakk, I guess that is one reason you are slightly higher rated than me at the moment; it seems you are slightly more willing to calculate one move or two deeper

Plans are very impostant! g4-f5 was a solid plan. It's one thing u can calculate correctly, but if you cant find the right plan, then calculation losing importance. Be glad your endgame intuition is correct more often than not, many chess players cant say the same! Long story short: I agree with you plan>calculation(also important)