Can some give me some crash courses on how to mate K+N+B vs K?

huybin
I don't know the method for it. Can't understand how to mate. Help me please
notmtwain
huybin wrote:
I don't know the method for it. Can't understand how to mate. Help me please

https://www.chess.com/drills/practice/bishop-and-knight-mate-the-edge

 

https://www.chess.com/drills/practice/bishop-and-knight-mate

huybin
Thanks, but it's locked. I can't afford premium account
notmtwain
huybin wrote:
Thanks, but it's locked. I can't afford premium account

Well I'm sure that somewhere on the internet you can find a book or an article on how to do it. There is no need to ask people to recreate this from scratch.

imsighked2

I wonder how often that comes up in games. I know I've played hundreds and hundreds of games, and I haven't seen a single knight and bishop or two bishop checkmate scenario. There are all kinds of videos on You Tube that can show you how to do it, if you're interested. I think it would be better to spend time studying rook endings, bishop of opposite colors endings, opposition and distant opposition, rather than focus on an obscure ending that you may never see.

JohnHS

Here you go:

yureesystem

once you learn it, its like riding a bike, you never forget it. happy.png

imsighked2

imsighked2

 Can anyone share an example from their own games here on Chess.com?

IMBacon

Wrong corner

Right corner

"W" maneouver

robbie_1969
imsighked2 wrote:

 Can anyone share an example from their own games here on Chess.com?

Its very rare that it happens in play but we learn it because it teaches us piece co-ordination or so the theory goes.

 

 

woton

 I've played 7 or 8 of these endings.  Below is a link to one of my games that used the technique.  It's not a pure K vs K+B+N endgame because there are other pieces on the board.  However, knowing the technique shortened the game (my first thought was to promoted a pawn, but that would have  required extra moves).  I have no idea how to find the actual K vs K+N+B games.

I practice this endgame a lot because I think that it's a fun endgame, but it's main benefit is learning how to co-ordinate the knight and bishop.  That comes in handy in many games.

www.chess.com/forum/view/endgames/kbn-vs-k2

Bloop_master7

im not sure i understand you. K+B+N v K is a draw by itself

Dsmith42

I've had to do it once in  a game that mattered, and on occasion it has been a useful mate to threaten in an endgame.  Basically, there are two stages to it:

 

1) Force the opposing king to the edge (side) of the board.  Using your bishop to control a diagonal, and your king and knight to close off the opposite-color squares adjacent to that diagonal, you can force the defending king to either give up a diagonal, or try to work around - either way, he ends up on the side of the board.

2) Push the defending king to the proper corner.  The "right" corner is the one the bishop can check.  The "W" maneuver places the defending king in repeated zugzwang, which forces him into the corner of your choice.  Once the defending king is enclosed, just be wary of stalemate and use your bishop to give up a tempo if necessary.

 

This may not be the fastest way, but it's the easiest to remember, and simple to perform once you've done it once.  The core concept is that you don't have to block a whole rank or file to force the defending king back, you just need to consistently block the three or four squares that would move the defending king towards the center of the board.  This isn't that hard to do.  Also, learning this checkmate allows you to see other mating patterns more easily, and enables you to create effective king barriers with minor pieces alone, which is a very useful skill in every game.

woton
Bloop_master7 wrote:

im not sure i understand you. K+B+N v K is a draw by itself

This is one variation

 

MARattigan
woton wrote:
Bloop_master7 wrote:

im not sure i understand you. K+B+N v K is a draw by itself

This is one variation

 

Black would actually play 6...Kc6. For some reason a lot of demonstrations on this site overlook that.

 

But for Bloop_master7's info, there are very few drawn positions in KBNK if you ignore positions that are already stalemate or where the lone king can immediately capture or effectively fork bishop and knight.  

woton

 6....Kc6

7. Bc4  Kc7

8. Bb5

I made a mistake in moving Ba6 on move 6, it should have been Bb5.  That's one of the pitfalls of this endgame.  Make a mistake and you may run out of time or exceed the 50-move rule (depends on the starting position).

 

MARattigan
woton wrote:

..., it should have been Bb5. 

Yes. 6.Be4 also works fine.

KeSetoKaiba

As woton describes, this is the "w maneuver" everyone mentions (due to the Knight's movement). However, take notice of how squares near the King are always controlled. This is the key. B+N mates take a little time to learn, but they are easy once you have seen it. Unfortunately, this endgame is extremely rare - but the skills learned from it are transferrable, and it serves as a huge confidence that you at least can mate with B+N. 

I disagree with the fact that it is like riding a bike (as several GMs even have learned it years ago, but got a draw in a game). Although I will say that anything in chess has a better chance of being found OTB if you have seen that pattern before. Good luck learning it wink.png

 

Giulio88

http://www.giyf.com/